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The below C# code executes in 3 seconds. I listed the SQL Profiler output as well. If I change the statement to not use Dynamic SQL it executes in milliseconds. I can't find any good resources to give a solution to this problem. But I was able to find an article that explaine that in Dynamic SQL since the parser doesn't know the value of the parameters, it cannot optimize the query plan.

public string GetIncorporation(Parcel parcel)
    {

    var result = (from c in _context.Districts
                  where c.PARCEL_ID == parcel.PARCEL_ID && c.DB_YEAR == parcel.DB_YEAR && c.DISTRICT_CD.CompareTo("9000") < 0
                  select c).ToList();

    exec sp_executesql N'SELECT 
[GroupBy1].[A1] AS [C1]
FROM ( SELECT 
    MAX([Filter1].[A1]) AS [A1]
    FROM ( SELECT 
        SUBSTRING([Extent1].[DISTRICT_CD], 0 + 1, 2) + N''00'' AS [A1]
        FROM [STAGE].[DISTRICT] AS [Extent1]
        WHERE ([Extent1].[PARCEL_ID] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Extent1].[DB_YEAR] = @p__linq__1) AND ([Extent1].[DISTRICT_CD] < N''9000'')
    )  AS [Filter1]
)  AS [GroupBy1]',N'@p__linq__0 nvarchar(4000),@p__linq__1 int',@p__linq__0=N'0001-02-0003',@p__linq__1=2012

I'm trying to build a service layer. I don't want to have a mixed batch of Stored Procedures and Linq Queries

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Did you paste that query in SSMS, run the execution plan, and see if it suggestions any missing indexes?

Also, if you don't need all the columns from the table, limit them by using a select:

var result = (from c in _context.Districts
                  where c.PARCEL_ID == parcel.PARCEL_ID && c.DB_YEAR == parcel.DB_YEAR && c.DISTRICT_CD.CompareTo("9000") < 0
                  select c.Parcel_ID).ToList();

or

var result = (from c in _context.Districts
                  where c.PARCEL_ID == parcel.PARCEL_ID && c.DB_YEAR == parcel.DB_YEAR && c.DISTRICT_CD.CompareTo("9000") < 0
                  select new { c.Parcel_ID, c.column2, c.column3}).ToList();
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Yes, I did that. It suggests I create an index on DB_YEAR including PARCEL_ID,DISTRICT_CD –  Mr. Manager Mar 13 '12 at 15:27
    
The thing is... I already have an index PARCEL_ID,DB_YEAR,DISTRICT_CD That is used by the t-sql version of the dynamic query. –  Mr. Manager Mar 13 '12 at 15:28

The LINQ looks fine, have you got the correct indexes?

In the query from SSMS you've pasted, it's not doing any limiting on DISTRICT_CD, so make sure that is actually the query that is running.

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Your performance problem is in the 'CompareTo' part. This function can not be translated to regular SQL, so the Entity framework will first materialize all objects matching the first 2 conditions (fetched with pure SQL). After this (whitch takes some time as you can see), the third condition is matched in memory. Avoid the CompareTo method in your linq query, and your problems will go away.

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You are incorrect. But you did point out a mistake in my question. I pasted the wrong sql. Strangely the linq engine does a perfect job of converting CompareTo() to a SQL statement. –  Mr. Manager Mar 14 '12 at 14:35
    
BTW I think that is AMAZING! that linq can make a conversion like that! I assumed it would work as you suggested. –  Mr. Manager Mar 14 '12 at 14:45

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