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I'm writing an application that must do some things in background: check emails and parse them to inject some data in a database, and connect to a web service to check status for some asynchronous operations.

Right now, my solution is a simple timer that performs these operations on a predefined schedule: email every five minutes, and web service checks every minute (but these are only performed if there is pending activity, so most of the time this does nothing.)

Right now I'm not using a thread for this (I'm early in the development stage.) But my plan is to create a background thread and let it do the work offline.

Couple of questions:

  1. I plan to control everything in the timer(s). Set up a global variable (rudimentary "locking",) start the thread. If the "lock" is already set, ignore it. The thread cleans it up on termination. Should I use a more robust locking / queue mechanism for my threads? (I already have OmniThread installed)
  2. How can I run a thread with low priority? I don't want the application to feel sluggish when the background thread is performing data insertion or networking.
  3. Is there a clean way to verify for user activity and start this thread only when the user is not busy at the keyboard / mouse?

Please have in mind that I'm not experienced with threads. I wrote an FTP sync application once so I'm not a complete newbie, but that was long time ago.

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1  
This is an application that allows you to create/edit invoices, etc. But it also needs to read email and parse it to inject attached electronic invoices as received documents, and to connect to the taxes office to get status of submitted invoices. I don't want to interrupt the user for these operations so I want them to run in background. –  Leonardo Herrera Mar 13 '12 at 15:19
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If your background works has no direct interaction with your application, I would suggest using a separate service (you can set it to low priority if you want) to run them. So, those works can be processed even if your application is closed or even no user logged in. –  Justmade Mar 13 '12 at 15:28
    
@Justmade - I do want to have some notification when new email (invoices) arrive. –  Leonardo Herrera Mar 13 '12 at 15:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. I plan to control everything in the timer(s). Set up a global variable (rudimentary "locking",) start the thread. If the "lock" is already set, ignore it. The thread cleans it up on termination. Should I use a more robust locking / queue mechanism for my threads? (I already have OmniThread installed)

I wouldn't bother with the Timer at all. Make your thread's loop look like this, and you'll have your delays. You will NOT need a lock because there's only one thread, it will not sleep until the previous job is over.

procedure YourThread;
var N: Integer;
begin
  while not Terminated do
  begin
    // Figure out if there's a job to do
    // Do the job

    // Sleep for a while, but give the thread a chance to notice
    // it needs to terminate.
    for N := 1 to 500 do
      if not Terminated then
        Sleep(100);
  end;
end;
  1. How can I run a thread with low priority? I don't want the application to feel sluggish when the background thread is performing data insertion or networking.

Don't bother. You can easily use SetThreadPriority but it's not worth the trouble. If your background thread is waiting for I/O (networking), then it will not consume any CPU resource. Even if your background thread works full-speed, your GUI will not feel sluggish because Windows does a good job of splitting available CPU time among all available threads.

  1. Is there a clean way to verify for user activity and start this thread only when the user is not busy at the keyboard / mouse?

Again, why bother checking for user activity? Checking for email is network (ie: I/O) bound, the thread checking for email will mostly be idle.

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Sleeping 50 seconds in a thread is a bit over the top. Please remember that when the time comes to kill the thread, the application will hang for 50 seconds in the worst case... –  whosrdaddy Mar 13 '12 at 18:44
    
'Please remember that when the time comes to kill the thread, the application will hang for 50 seconds in the worst case' - not if the OS kills it on app close. If threads are expected to run until app close, and you don't explicitly try to terminate and wait for them, there is no problem - the app will shut down without any delay. –  Martin James Mar 14 '12 at 12:02
    
agreed, but threads that live on after app close are evil :) –  whosrdaddy Mar 15 '12 at 15:33

For part 3 of your question, the Windows API has a GetLastInputInfo function which should return information about the last time the user did something. It even says it's "This function is useful for input idle detection". I did plan to use this for something myself, but haven't had a chance to test it.

Edit: Delphi implementation link

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It works correctly (used to invoke screensaver, task scheduler idle tasks etc) –  OnTheFly Mar 13 '12 at 18:57

Can you not just do all this in the background thread, getting rid of all the thread micro-management? Seems to me that you could just loop around a sleep(60000) call in the background thread. Check the web service every time round the loop, check the email every 5 times round. You can set the priority to tpLower, if you want, but this thread is going to be sleeping or blocked on I/O nearly all the time, so I don't think it's even worth the typing.

I would be surprised if such a thread is noticeable at all to the user at the keyboard/mouse, no matter when it runs.

'Set up a global variable (rudimentary "locking",) start the thread' - what is this global variable intended to do? What is there to lock?

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I don't know how long will take for this thread to complete. So if the TTimer is set to five minutes the earlier invocation may still be active; that's why I mention some form of locking. –  Leonardo Herrera Mar 13 '12 at 15:26
    
As having only one background thread, sleeping most of the time may work. So you say this is inexpensive? –  Leonardo Herrera Mar 13 '12 at 15:28
    
@LeonardoHerrera - it should be OK, yes. Using a sleep loop keeps the main thread 'out of it' - the timer is not required. If an activity takes more than five minutes, it does not matter - a new activity cannot begin until five minutes after the last one finishes. If this 'jiter' is unacceptable, it's not difficult to store a 'lastRun' TdateTime for when the last activity run was started. A new sleep() interval can then be calculated after the activity as 'trunc((now-lastRun)*msecPerDay)'. NOTE: if this number is negative, don't sleep at all else you will be sleeping for a very long time! –  Martin James Mar 13 '12 at 16:31
    
@LeonardoHerrera - notification of new emails. After parsing the TidMessage, (or whatever), into the database tables, you could either PostMessage() the TidMessage thingy to you main thread, use TThread.Synchronize, (ugh!), or maybe you could use a database trigger to fire an event, (seems a bit OTT). –  Martin James Mar 13 '12 at 16:36

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