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I want to get the address of _GLOBAL_OFFSET_TABLE_ in my program. One way is to use the nm command in Linux, maybe redirect the output to a file and parse that file to get address of _GLOBAL_OFFSET_TABLE_. However, that method seems to be quite inefficient. What are some more efficient methods of doing it?

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1 Answer 1

up vote -1 down vote accepted

This appears to work:

#include <stdio.h>

extern void *_GLOBAL_OFFSET_TABLE_;

int main()
{
    printf("_GLOBAL_OFFSET_TABLE = %p\n", &_GLOBAL_OFFSET_TABLE_);
    return 0;
}

It gives:

$ ./test
_GLOBAL_OFFSET_TABLE = 0x6006d0

However, nm thinks different:

$ nm test | fgrep GLOBAL
0000000000600868 d _GLOBAL_OFFSET_TABLE_
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Vow, this is amazing! –  MetallicPriest Mar 13 '12 at 15:28
    
@MetallicPriest Perhaps you can tell me why nm gives a different value? –  trojanfoe Mar 13 '12 at 15:29
    
OK, when I'll check it I'll let you know :). –  MetallicPriest Mar 13 '12 at 16:22
5  
This code is definitely not right. You're printing the first entry of the GOT, which is probably a pointer to DYNAMIC, not the address of the GOT. To print the address of the GOT you should be using &_GLOBAL_OFFSET_TABLE_. –  R.. Mar 13 '12 at 17:23
    
@trojanfoe just add the ampersand as R.. indicated, I believe that will fix it. –  Jonathon Reinhart Mar 13 '13 at 7:58

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