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I'm debugging a plug-in for a commercial software. The application crashes just after the exit button is pressed. These crashes appear on windows vista 64 sp2 or vista 32 (don't remember if sp) but not on windows xp sp3. According to the crash log produced by the application, it appears that I have some heap issues, so I debug with page heap activated.

Almost starting from scratch, I took a plug-in example code in which I gradually add my code. My plug-in adds a button which creates my tool. The tool and the button are two separate COM objects. The button is always created, but the tool object is created only if I push the button. Now, I added some code in the tool part, the code is not executed, the tool object isn't even created, but the program crashes. Without that part of code, it does not. It doesn't seems to be dependent of that part of the code, when I comment it and add some code elsewhere (which won't be executed), the program crashes the same way.

adplus tells me : corrupted heap pointer or using wrong heap xx : Heap used in the call xx : Heap block xx : Block size xx : Heap owning the block

Any idea or debugging strategy I could start with ?

Thanks.

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Some code would be useful. A simple repro case. –  Robinson Mar 13 '12 at 18:58

1 Answer 1

Giving code examples will always help.

Heap corruption is really tricky because even if it is wrong it may not be detected. So while you may get a crash consistently in one way, it doesn't mean that it isn't corrupted when you aren't crashing.

Crashing without being able to attach is plausibly caused due to static initialization. I would try and initialize those types of resources manually when your DLL is attached. Delete the resources when the DLL is detached, and set the pointers to zero. Have "main" static functions that handle this that you can step into.

You may also be making assumptions about the initialization order of statics, which is not guaranteed in the slightest. What is worse is that they will behave relatively consistent for a long time and then break at a seemingly random time for some reason that isn't at all obvious.

Another possibility with COM objects is that your binary compatibility no longer matches the interface the calling code expects. If the interface you are fulfilling is not PURE virtual, this can be especially unexpected. If the interface has any methods with default implementations, you need to override them.

struct foo_base {
  virtual ~foo_base() {}
  virtual std::string getName() const {
    return "Willem Dafoe";
  }
};

struct foo_derived : public foo_base {
  virtual ~foo_derived() {}
};

Even though this is completely valid C++, it may not work as a COM object.

Add an implementation for the virtual method that just calls the base if you aren't interested in the gory details.

struct foo_base {
  virtual ~foo_base() {}
  virtual std::string getName() const {
    return "Willem Dafoe";
  }
};

struct foo_derived : public foo_base {
  virtual ~foo_derived() {}
  virtual std::string getName() const {
    return foo_base::getName();
  }
};

I've never seen a heap corruption message from this personally, but I've seen it call methods with garbage pointers. I could see where that might get detected as heap corruption if you tried to free it.

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