Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following C code is my own way of writing a primitive linked list. It uses a struct called lnode. I know this is not the best/most efficient way to do it but my idea is this: create the base node, use an "iterator" pointer, here q, that points to that last node in the list and then add a new node.

The following code will not compile. I can't find the cause but it hates this line

struct lnode *q= malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));

Any advice on making this idea work? Thanks in advance.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct lnode{
    int value;
    struct lnode *nextnode;

};

int main(){

    struct lnode *startnode = malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));
    startnode->value=0;
    startnode->nextnode=NULL;

    struct lnode *q= malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));

    int i = 0;

    for(i=0;i<10;i++){

        struct lnode *p  = malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));
        p= q->nextnode;
        p->value=i;
        p->nextnode=NULL;
        q=p;


    }


return 0;


}

I would like to point out that I'm a novice. I'm using the Watcom compiler (Why? My computer is old and its all I need for these practice porgrams) The log output is

structure1.c(17): Error! E1063: Missing operand structure1.c(17):

Warning! W111: Meaningless use of an expression structure1.c(17):

Error! E1009: Expecting ';' but found 'struct' structure1.c(17):

Error! E1011: Symbol 'lnode' has not been declared structure1.c(17):

Error! E1011: Symbol 'q' has not been declared structure1.c(17):

Error! E1014: Left operand must be an 'lvalue' structure1.c(19):

I followed the advice given and changed the code the new code is this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct lnode{
    int value;
    struct lnode *nextnode;

};

int main(){

    struct lnode *startnode = (struct lnode *)malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));
    struct lnode *q;
    startnode->value=0;
    startnode->nextnode=NULL;

    q = malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));


    doLoop(q);

return 0;


}

void doLoop(struct lnode *q){

    int i = 0;

    for(i=0;i<10;i++){

        struct lnode *p  = (struct lnode *)malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));
        q->nextnode=p;
        p->value=i;
        p->nextnode=NULL;
        printf("%i, %i\n",p->value,q->value);
        q=p;

    }
}

I printed the "value" values of each node in the list along with the previous value. It works except the first iteration which gives a weird output.

share|improve this question
1  
What is the error message that you get from the compiler? –  Jesper Mar 13 '12 at 15:52
1  
It compiles fine for me with GCC –  Charles Salvia Mar 13 '12 at 15:53
    
Don't for the love of Jesus cast the return value of malloc()! –  user529758 Mar 13 '12 at 15:54
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I suspect the compiler (Microsoft compilers for example) supports C89 standard only, which does not permit the intermingling of code and declarations. Move declaration of q to top of scope:

int main(){

    struct lnode *startnode = (struct lnode *)malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));
    struct lnode *q
    startnode->value=0;
    startnode->nextnode=NULL;

    q = malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));
share|improve this answer
add comment

The code compiles - http://ideone.com/j6fGe - but the logic is wrong:

 struct lnode *p  = (struct lnode *)malloc(sizeof(struct lnode));
 p= q->nextnode;

Besides the fact that you have a memory leak, I'm sure this is not what you intended.

q->nextnode doesn't point to a valid node, just some random memory. Which you then try to overwrite with p->value=i;.

share|improve this answer
    
How would you recommend fixing this? I'm trying to base this a little bit on the tnode struct example in K&R. –  Caveman Mar 13 '12 at 16:06
1  
@JJG I don't know, because I don't know what you're trying to achieve. What I'm saying is, after you get past the compiler error, you'll run into this. Better post a different question when you reach this. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 13 '12 at 16:08
add comment

The error messages is due to the mixing of code and declarations.

Further; You switch p and q around in the for loop.

p = q->next_node; /* here you set p to an undefined area. 
                   * q->next_node is not malloc'd */
p->value = i;     /* here you cause undefined / erronous behaviour
                   * Most probably a SIGSEGV */

So to sum it up, perhaps something like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct lnode{
    int value;
    struct lnode *nextnode;
};

int main(void)
{

    struct lnode *startnode;
    struct lnode *p;
    size_t z;
    int i;

    z = sizeof(struct lnode);

    if ((startnode = malloc(z)) == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Unable to malloc %d bytes.\n", z);
        return 1;
    }

    /* Fill list */   
    p = startnode;
    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        if ((p->nextnode = malloc(z)) == NULL) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Unable to malloc %d bytes.\n", z);
            return 1;
        }

        p->value = i;
        p = p->nextnode;
        p->nextnode = NULL;
    }

    /* Print values */    
    p = startnode;
    while (p->nextnode != NULL) {
        printf("value: %2d\n", p->value);
        p = p->nextnode;
    }

    /* Free */
    p = startnode;
    while (p != NULL) {
        p = p->nextnode;
        free(startnode);
        startnode = p;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.