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Following is a fancy code:

class B
{
    private:
        int sum;

    public:
        B ()
        {
            sum = 0;
        }

        B& add (int number)
        {
            sum =+ number;
            return *this;
        }
};

int main ()
{
    B obj;
    obj.add (1).add (2).add (3). add (4);
}

Fine, what are the "serious" uses of returning the this pointer from a function call?

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11  
What really is serious is that you are returning *this from a function declared to return void :-) –  hochl Mar 13 '12 at 16:25
2  
Operators will often return a reference to the object in question, to allow chaining, so return *this. Much as in your example. This is a "serious" use. –  BoBTFish Mar 13 '12 at 16:25
    
@hochl That's dumb of me, will correct the code. –  TheIndependentAquarius Mar 13 '12 at 16:29
    
@hochl Does that make sense now? –  TheIndependentAquarius Mar 13 '12 at 16:30
1  
If you declare it as B& add( ... ) then yes. –  hochl Mar 13 '12 at 16:32

5 Answers 5

The initial reason wass for chaining mathematical operations, like this:

class mynumberclass {
    int internal;
public:
    mynumberclass(int);
    mynumberclass operator+(const mynumberclass&) const;
    mynumberclass operator-(const mynumberclass&) const;
    mynumberclass operator*(const mynumberclass&) const;
    mynumberclass operator/(const mynumberclass&) const;
    mynumberclass operator%(const mynumberclass&) const;
    mynumberclass& operator+=(const mynumberclass&);
    mynumberclass& operator-=(const mynumberclass&);
    mynumberclass& operator*=(const mynumberclass&);
    mynumberclass& operator/=(const mynumberclass&);
    mynumberclass& operator%=(const mynumberclass&);
};

int main() {
    mynumberclass a(3);
    mynumberclass b(4);
    mynumberclass c = (a * b + b) / 2; //this chains 3 of the above operators
}

without chaining, that code would have to look like this:

int main() {
    mynumberclass a(3);
    mynumberclass b(4);
    mynumberclass c(a);
    c *= b;
    c += b;
    c /= 2;
}

FredLarson also mentions the Named Parameter Idiom, which is certainly an awesome thing you can use chaining for.

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1  
You for sure don't want dyadic operators modifying their left operand. You return by value from them. –  AProgrammer Mar 13 '12 at 16:59
    
@AProgrammer: Never seen the word "dyadic" before, but I realized what you meant anyway. Fixed. Thanks! –  Mooing Duck Mar 13 '12 at 17:01

One use of this is for the Named Parameter Idiom. It depends on method chaining.

class Person;

class PersonOptions
{
  friend class Person;
  string name_;
  int age_;
  char gender_;

public:
   PersonOptions() 
   : age_(0), gender_('U')
   {}

   PersonOptions& name(const string& n) { name_ = n; return *this; }
   PersonOptions& age(int a) { age_ = a; return *this; }
   PersonOptions& gender(char g) { gender_ = g; return *this; }
};

class Person
{
  string name_;
  int age_;
  char gender_;

public:
   Person(const PersonOptions& opts) 
   : name_(opts.name_), age_(opts.age_), gender_(opts.gender_)
   {}
};
Person p = PersonOptions().name("George").age(57).gender('M');
Person p = PersonOptions().age(25).name("Anna");
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@MooingDuck: Thanks for covering my laziness. ;v) –  Fred Larson Mar 13 '12 at 17:03
    
middle click, CTRL+C, select this tab, CTRL+V? –  Mooing Duck Mar 13 '12 at 17:08
mycode $ fgrep -r 'return *this' /usr/include/c++/4.4.3 | wc -l
592
mycode $
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what did you mean here? I missed the point. –  TheIndependentAquarius Mar 13 '12 at 16:35
5  
@Anisha: the point is that there are 592 uses of return *this in GCC's library headers. Presumably all or most of these are "serious", so you can look at any of them for examples. –  Steve Jessop Mar 13 '12 at 16:38
    
The standard library wouldn't work without this. –  Rob K Mar 13 '12 at 17:11

An example would be;

class basic_ostream
    : ...
{
    basic_ostream& operator<<(bool n);

You really want to return this to be able to chain to;

std::cout << boolValue << std::endl;
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1  
Shouldn't this be basic_ostream& operator<<(basic_ostream& osr, bool n) ? –  hochl Mar 13 '12 at 16:27
2  
If you are creating an operator<< for your own class, yes, as it won't be a member function. But for the standard ones it is probably a member function, so a relevant example. –  BoBTFish Mar 13 '12 at 16:30
    
@hochl It's a member of basic_ostream actually, added a skeleton class header to clarify. –  Joachim Isaksson Mar 13 '12 at 16:32
    
"The defense rests, your honor." –  hochl Mar 13 '12 at 16:36

The first thing that comes to mind is chaining functions to perform operations on the same object. jQuery, although not C++, has shown that this can be a very useful paradigm.

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