Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I'm using Windows7 using CPython for python3.22 and MinGW's g++.exe for C++ (which means I use the libstdc++ as the runtime library). I wrote two simple programs to compare their speed.

Python:

x=0
while x!=1000000:
    x+=1
    print(x)

C++:

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    int x=0;
    while(x!=1000000)
        {
        x++;
        std::cout<<x<<std::endl;
        }
    return 0;
}

Both not optimized.

I ran c++ first, then i ran python through the interactive command line, which is much slower than directly starting a .py file.

However, python outran c++ and turned out to be more than twice as fast. Python took 53 seconds, c++ took 1 minute and 54 seconds.

Is it because python has some special optimization done to the interpreter or is it because C++ has to refer to and std which slows it down and makes it take up ram?
Or is it some other reason?

Edit: I tried again, with \n instead of std::endl, and compiling with the -O3 flag, this time it took 1 min to reach 500,000.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by KillianDS, RAS, HaskellElephant, towi, Stephan Branczyk Jul 30 '13 at 9:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

22  
So according to your benchmark, an infinite loop in Python runs twice as fast as printing a single number in C++? That's indeed strange. –  Sven Marnach Mar 13 '12 at 16:46
4  
Ahm, these code samples do entirely different things... The first one doesn't even terminate. –  Niklas B. Mar 13 '12 at 16:46
2  
@Mooing Duck: I agree, this should be reopened if OP changes the examples to be actually equivalent. I too think that this could be solved by using \n instead of std::endl in the C++ sample. –  Niklas B. Mar 13 '12 at 16:50
4  
5  
@busukxuan: Could you know PLEASE edit all this extra info into the question? Maybe it will get reopened then. What you should add: C++ compiler, architecture, operating system, Python implementation/version, and especially code that actually terminates! Make this an interesting question and people will bother. Also, format the C++ code properly. –  Niklas B. Mar 13 '12 at 17:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There isn't anything obvious here. Since Python's written in C, it must use something like printf to implement print. C++ I/O Streams, like cout, are usually implemented in a way that's much slower than printf. If you want to put C++ on a better footing, you can try changing to:

#include <cstdio>
int main()
{
    int x=0;
    while(x!=1000000)
    {
        ++x;
        std::printf("%d\n", x);
    }
    return 0;
}

I did change to using ++x instead of x++. Years ago people thought that this was a worthwhile "optimization." I will have a heart attack if that change makes any difference in your program's performance (OTOH, I am positive that using std::printf will make a huge difference in runtime performance). Instead, I made the change simply because you aren't paying attention to what the value of x was before you incremented it, so I think it's useful to say that in code.

share|improve this answer
2  
so you're saying that c++ is only slower than python because python is using the most direct way to implement print, and that the difference is caused by the print thing? Hmm... I think i should go try it without the print. –  busukxuan Mar 13 '12 at 18:43
3  
Oh god, thanks for the help.... I removed the print and cout, and python took more than 10 seconds to count to 10^8, and C++ done that in a flash(not a metaphor or hyperbole, i do mean a fraction of a second, yes, a real flash). So the problem is the cout... Now I learned a great lesson. Thank you so much! –  busukxuan Mar 13 '12 at 18:53
1  
@busukxuan: Writing to the console will always be slow. Have you tried redirecting the output of each program to a file instead? Your little programs are almost certainly I/O bound and writing to a file would eliminate the slow console writes. –  Blastfurnace Mar 13 '12 at 18:53
6  
@bosukxuan: The C++ compiler probably removes the whole loop if you don't output anything... That's no proof that cout is indeed the problem here. –  Niklas B. Mar 13 '12 at 19:53

One of my colleague at work told me that Python code is faster than C++ code and then showed this topic as an example to prove his point. It is now obvious from other answers that what is wrong with the C++ code posted in the question. I still would like to summarize my benchmarks which I did in order to show him how fast a good C++ code can be!

There are two problems with the original C++ code:

  • It uses std::endl to print a newline in each iteration. That is a bad bad idea because std::endl does more stuff than simply printing a newline — it also forces the stream to flush the buffer accumulated so far; flushing is an expensive operation as it has to deal with hardware – the output device. So the first fix is this: if you want to print a newline, just use '\n'.

  • The second problem is less obvious as it is not seen in the code. It is in the design of C++ streams. By default, C++ streams are synchronized to the C streams after each input and output operation so that your application could mix std::cout and std::printf, and std::cin and std::scanf without any problem. This feature (yes, it is a feature) is not needed in this case so we can disable this, as it has a little runtime overhead (that is not a problem; it doesn't make C++ bad; it is simply a price for the feature). So the second fix is this: std::cout::sync_with_stdio(false);

And here is the final optimized code:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false); 

    int x = 0;
    while ( x != 1000000 )
    {
         ++x;
         std::cout << x << '\n';
    }
}

And compile this with -O3 flags and run (and measure) as:

$ g++ benchmark.cpp -O3    #compilation
$ time ./a.out             #run

//..

real   0m32.175s
user   0m0.088s
sys    0m0.396s

And run and measure python code (posted in the question):

$ time ./benchmark.py

//...

real  0m35.714s
user  0m3.048s
sys   0m4.456s

The user and sys time tell us which one is fast, and by what order.

Hope that helps you to remove your doubts. :-)

share|improve this answer

Same problem as posed in Why is reading lines from stdin much slower in C++ than Python? but in the opposite direction.

add

std::cout.sync_with_stdio(false);

to the top of the program

share|improve this answer

I think we need more information, but I would expect you're building an un-optimized build of C++. Try building it with the -O3 flag. (someone who knows GCC better will have more and better recommendations). However, here's some timings from a completely untrustworthy source: http://ideone.com. I ran each 5 times to get some measure of variance on the timing, but only the origonal C++ varied, and not much at that.

Python: http://ideone.com/WBWB9 time: 0.07-0.07s
Your C++: http://ideone.com/tzwQJ time: 0.05-0.06s
Modified C++: http://ideone.com/pXJo3 time: 0.00s-0.00s

As for why my C++ was faster than yours, std::endl forces C++ to flush the buffer immediately. '\n' does the newline without the forced buffer flush, which is much much much faster.

(note: I only ran to 12773, since ideone.com kills processes after they display a certain amount of output, that was the most the server would give me)

share|improve this answer
    
i tried again, with \n, and -O3, this time it took 1 min to reach 500,000 –  busukxuan Mar 13 '12 at 18:10
    
In that case, I only have one theory. Could you open up cmd.exe and test both of them in that console, to be sure it's not the console that's different? Because the timings should be almost identical for both Python and C++ for your test. This is because displaying stuff on the console takes a lot of processor time that should be identical for both languages. The loop is nothing compared to that. –  Mooing Duck Mar 13 '12 at 18:23
    
still the same result...T.T Does the CPU affect the result? I heard that AMD processors are much faster where Intel processors are slower but can handle many tasks at a time –  busukxuan Mar 13 '12 at 18:30
3  
@busukxuan: wrong. If you have a loop with no output, the C++ will do nothing at all. It didn't count anything. That's why benchmarks are hard. –  Mooing Duck Mar 13 '12 at 19:24
1  
Could also try -march=native –  quantum Mar 13 '12 at 21:07

std::endl lags, use '\n' will make c++ faster.

share|improve this answer
    
i tried, about the same(a few seconds slower, should be random difference) –  busukxuan Mar 13 '12 at 18:04

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.