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I'm trying to make a program that looks for syntax and everytime it goes from state to state It needs to indicate that state. I'm getting different output that I shouldn't have got.

using namespace cppfsm;
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using std::cin;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::vector;

int cppfsm::updateState(int& state, char c) {
    const int state1 = 1;
    const int state2 = 2;

    switch (state) {
    case state1:
        if (c == '/')
            cout << "1" << endl;
            // do stuff; update state
        else if (c == '"')
            cout << "1" << endl;
            // do something else; update state

    case state2:
        if (c == '/')
            cout << "1" << endl;
            // do stuff; update state
        else if (c == '"')
            cout << "1" << endl;
            // do something else; update state

    }
    return 0;
}

void testFSM(string s) {
    vector<int> stlist; // list of states.
    int cstate = start;
    for (unsigned long i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        stlist.push_back(updateState(cstate,s[i]));
    }
    // push the last state:
    stlist.push_back(cstate);
    cout << s << endl;
    for (unsigned long i = 0; i < stlist.size(); i++) {
        cout << stlist[i];
    }
    cout << endl;
}

int main() {
    // the finite state machine:
    string input;
    while(getline(cin,input)) {
        cout << " ";
        testFSM(input);
    }
    return 0;
}

the output should be looking like this. the numbers are the states when going from 1 to another

$ echo "int x; // holds stuff" | ./fsm 
int x; // holds stuff
0111010042222222222222
$ echo 'cout << "some string";' | ./fsm 
cout << "some string";
01111000033333333333300
$ echo 'cout << "\"escape\" chars are fun";' | ./fsm 
cout << "\"escape\" chars are fun";
011110000353333333533333333333333300

But my output comes out to be all 0000......s. How do I fix this problem?

share|improve this question
    
what is the value of start initially? –  perreal Mar 13 '12 at 16:50
    
what you mean by start initially? you get the input from cin. do you mean the 0 as the first state? –  user1261771 Mar 13 '12 at 16:52
    
yes the initial state start is not defined in the posted code –  perreal Mar 13 '12 at 16:54
    
whats that mean??? "yes the initial state start is not defined in the posted code" ?? –  user1261771 Mar 13 '12 at 17:18

3 Answers 3

If you're wondering why stlist is all 0's, take a look at the return statement for updateState:

     return 0;
}

Compare this with your code for populating stlist:

stlist.push_back(updateState(cstate,s[i]));

As far as I can tell, all 0's is the correct behavior of this code. Obviously, this is not the expected or logical behavior, so I suggest changing updateState:

int cppfsm::updateState(int& state, char c) {
    // ...
    return state;
}

Now when you run the code stlist should contain each state change as intended.

share|improve this answer
    
Except for the fact that state will always hold the value of start, because he forgot to ever change it. –  Mooing Duck Mar 13 '12 at 17:00
    
@MooingDuck: I assumed "do stuff; update state" covered that. If he's got problems in code he's not showing us, I can't help the OP. –  user7116 Mar 13 '12 at 17:05

It looks like you aleays call updateState with the same value, start. That value ist not handled in the switch, so the function returns zero. This means tha you just keep appending zeros to the stlist vector.

Try handling the start state in the switch, and the return value of the updateState function should be assigned to the cstate variable.

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't actually matter as updateState always returns 0 in his code. –  user7116 Mar 13 '12 at 16:55
    
@sixlettervariables thats true. I assumed he omitted most of the code for handling the states in the case branches. There aren't even any break statements. However, now that i reread his code, i see he passes the current state by reference, so maybe the argument is supposed to be. Modified to reflect the new state and the return value is something else. –  Frerich Raabe Mar 13 '12 at 17:02
    
so what should the return value be? –  user1261771 Mar 13 '12 at 17:17

Your code never checks you start state:

switch (state) {
    case state1: /* ... */
    case state2: /* ... */
    case start : /* ... */
}
share|improve this answer

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