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I'm trying to mock ToString() call on my custom object. I've created a mock for the interface and setting expectation on ToString() call

interface ICustomObject
{
}

var customObjectMock = MockRepository.GenerateMock<ICustomObject>();
var fakeDump = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
customObjectMock.Expect(c => c.ToString()).Return(fakeDump).Repeat.Any();

Whilst test run I got run time exception saying:

System.InvalidOperationException : Invalid call, the last call has been used or no call has been made (make sure that you are calling a virtual (C#).

Well-known error, but why I got it considering that ToString() is virtual?

And more interesting - I've worked it around simply by defining ToString() explicitly in the interface:

interface ICustomObject
{
  // Weird! I believe such method definition in interface would be confusing
  // without a special remark comment saying that this method is redefined 
  // to satisfy RhinoMocks (perhaps Reflection?)
  string ToString();
}

After this RM allows setting expectations on ToString().

Just wondering why RinoMocks obligates me redefine standard virtual Object.ToString()? Perhaps RM does not consider such standard methods which available for each Framework's object and obligates redefining all methods/properties expl;icitly in order to be able setting expectations?

share|improve this question
    
Is the ToString() method in your custom object really virtual, or did you override ToString() with your own, non-virtual declaration? –  Robert Harvey Mar 13 '12 at 17:08
    
I just using my interface to create a mock and set expectations so not using any custom object. MSDN - public virtual string ToString() –  sll Mar 13 '12 at 17:10
    
Does RhinoMocks require you to set such expectations for other methods besides ToString()? Without a custom object, and in the absence of method declarations in your interface, I'm not sure how RhinoMocks would even be aware of your methods, including ToString(). –  Robert Harvey Mar 13 '12 at 17:12
    
I expected that RM pick up Object methods since everything inherited from the Object class and would has Object's methods –  sll Mar 13 '12 at 17:22
2  
Interfaces are not objects. Although you can call ToString() on an interface implicitly, the assumption is that there exists some object that implements your interface, and therefore provides an implementation of ToString() implicitly. I don't think it's as simple as you believe. –  Robert Harvey Mar 13 '12 at 17:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Interfaces are not objects.

Although you can call ToString() on an interface implicitly, the assumption is that there exists some object that implements your interface, and therefore provides an implementation of ToString() implicitly.

Since you don't provide an implementation of your interface, there is nothing to "hook" the ToString() method, and apparently RhinoMocks figures it doesn't make much sense to test a method that doesn't actually exist.

share|improve this answer
    
It makes sense for me thanks again! BTW, just wondering whether it woudl be right if RhinoMocks allows setting expectations on such base Object methods, otherwise I've to redefine such methods just to satisfy RhinoMocks/(Reflection?) in interface which looks weird without special remark comment –  sll Mar 13 '12 at 17:45
    
The purpose of ToString() is to provide a human-readable representation of an object. Why would you need to unit test that, other than to prove it's actually returning something? –  Robert Harvey Mar 13 '12 at 17:58
    
Having complex hierarchy of the obejcts I would like to ensure that top-parent dump all childs details in ToString(). Both child/parent overrides ToString(). So I mocking childs, passing in the parent (root) and then calling root.ToString(), to provide wel--mocked childs I have to mock ToString() call for childs. And I'm logging this ToString() so thsi is pretty important point - ensure that correct info was dumped. I can provide own public string DumpDetails() but decided to use ToString(), what you think? –  sll Mar 13 '12 at 18:01
    
But if you change even one character in the implementation of any ToString() in the hierarchy, it breaks all of your unit tests. Is the implementation of ToString() critical to your application's operation? It shouldn't be. –  Robert Harvey Mar 13 '12 at 18:03
    
I want to be sure that root.ToString() dumps all hierarchy details, and I'm using only one real object in test - root, all childs are mocked. –  sll Mar 13 '12 at 18:05

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