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I tagged this question both Java and Scala because while I mainly develop on Java I'd like to see if the solution on Scala will be different.

I have a problem with designing classes for my application. I have a set of common objects with different behaviour. As I recently read some book about patterns I told: "Okay, I can use a Strategy pattern here", define behaviour as some field object and delegate it all the logic. And here are my problem started :)

Let's say I have a base class Duck which can fly and I delegate flying to some FlyBehaviour.

interface IFlyable { void fly(); }

interface IFlyBehaviour { void fly(); }

class Duck implements IFlyable {
    IFlyBehaviour flyBehaviour;

    void fly() {
        flyBehaviour.fly();
    }
}

But my ducks are a little different and I realize that I want the behaviour to depend on it. First I have a SpaceDuck which should fly in space and use a spaceShip field which defined only for SpaceDuck. Next I have a HelicopterDuck which I want to fly as low as possible and use some anti-air-defence flares which are defined only for HelicopterDuck. So in code it's something like this

class SpaceDuck extends Duck {
    String spaceship;
}

class SpaceFlyBehaviour implements IFlyBehaviour {
    void fly() {
        System.out.println("Flying in space on spaceship: " + spaceduck.spaceship);
    }
}

class HelicopterDuck extends Duck {
    int flares;
}

class HelicopterFlyBehaviour implements IFlyBehaviour {
    void fly() {
        while(helicopterduck.flares > 0) {
            System.out.println("I'm going low and using flares");
            helicopterduck.flares--;
        }
    }
}

Here in my behaviour implementations I don't actually have a reference to spaceduck or helicopterduck and this code won't compile. I just provided a sample of how I imagined and would like it to be. I could modify IFlyBehaviour and pass duck as an argument to fly() method but then I have to downcast to get access to duck specific fields which is not a good idea I guess.

It looks like the obvious way is just dropping IFlyBehaviour away and move the logic to fly() method of each duck. But I expect a lot of different space fly behaviours and helicopter behaviours and fly() is not the only method. It will be squack(), run() and etc. and each with different set of behaviours. So my class hierarchy will become huge and unsupportable.

In my real application I will have some runnable and stoppable instances which can be run and stopped in different way. One instance would be started via SSH script, another via MBean (or SSH, it depends on how user configured it), third using some 3rd party and etc. So I hope the Duck sample reflexes my problem quite well.

Any thoughts to push me in right direction would be very helpful. Thanks in advance!

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1  
you may find this to be of interest: cowboyprogramming.com/2007/01/05/evolve-your-heirachy –  Ray Tayek Mar 13 '12 at 17:56
    
Looks interesting. Thanks for sharing. –  Soteric Mar 13 '12 at 18:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In Scala, traits were included just for this kind of stuff.

In Java, it is more difficult. I would try getting rid of the duck subclasses rather than the behaviours, moving the type-specific properties into the behaviour classes. If you only use the ducks via their common interface, these properties are unavailable anyway - they should only be seen at the point of instantiation.

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That makes sense. I'll follow this way. Thanks. –  Soteric Mar 13 '12 at 18:56

First, you haven't initialized the flyBehaviour in the Duck class. You could initialize it like this:

class SpaceDuck extends Duck {
    String spaceship;
    public Duck() {
        setFlyBehavior(new SpaceFlyBehaviour(this));
    }
}

Alternatively you can provide a reference of the duck in the behavior's method:

interface IFlyable { void fly(); }

interface IFlyBehaviour { void fly(IFlyable flyable); }

Or the simplest way:

public abstract class Duck {
    public abstract void fly();
}

public class SpaceDuck extends Duck {
    String spaceship;
    public void fly() {
        System.out.println("Flying in space on spaceship: " + spaceduck.spaceship);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In scala you could do something like this:

abstract class Duck {def fly: Unit}

class BasicDuck extends Duck { def fly {println("flying")} }

trait SpaceshipFlight extends Duck {
    def spaceship: String
    abstract override def fly() {
        super.fly
        println("but now I'm in space on a: " + spaceship);
    }
}

trait Flares extends SpaceshipFlight {
    var flares: Int
    abstract override def fly() {
        super.fly
        while(flares > 0) {
            println("I'm going low: flares are at " + flares)
            flares=flares-1
        }
    }
}

At the call site you could then mix the traits you like with your Duck

scala> new BasicDuck with SpaceshipFlight {def spaceship="rocket"}
res1: BasicDuck with SpaceshipFlight = $anon$1@751d3ec8

scala> res1.fly
flying
but now I'm in space on a: rocket

//now with flares!
scala> new BasicDuck with SpaceshipFlight with Flares {def spaceship="rocket"; var flares=5}
res2: BasicDuck with SpaceshipFlight with Flares = $anon$1@4f6b3939

scala> res2.fly
flying
but now I'm in space on a: rocket
I'm going low: flares are at 5
I'm going low: flares are at 4
I'm going low: flares are at 3
I'm going low: flares are at 2
I'm going low: flares are at 1

Note that I've changed your example a little to show that in scala you can also make one trait override the behaviour of the previous one, so you can use "super" like we did in the SpaceshipFlight and Flares traits and make traits themselves "stackable" (this is in fact called the "stackable trait pattern")

EDIT adding a second way (where you can inject different behaviors after instantiation)

class Duck
def fly[D <: Duck](duck:D, flyBehavior: (D => Unit)) {
    flyBehavior(duck)
}      

class SpaceDuck(val spaceship: String) extends Duck 

val d = new SpaceDuck("rocket") 

// a behavior is now simply a function (no need to wrap it in a class)
val spacefly = (d: SpaceDuck) => println("flying on a " + d.spaceship)
val normalfly = (d: SpaceDuck) => println("flying normally. Not using my " + d.spaceship)

// using different behaviors at runtime
fly(d, spacefly) // flying on a rocket
fly(d, normalfly) // flying normally. Not using my rocket
share|improve this answer
    
Scala traits look great and powerful but less flexible in this concrete case. I won't be able to change behaviour in runtime, correct? I also won't be able to choose behaviour using class name provided by user (in Java I can instantiate the object by class name). Thanks for the sample anyway, it was interesting. I love Scala but my colleagues don't :) –  Soteric Mar 13 '12 at 19:46
1  
@Soteric; I added a second way you can code this in scala, that allows you to change behavior at runtime. As for creating a class from a string, scala does allow you to do Class.forName("Duck").newInstance but I agree that scala's reflection (as in 2.9) is not nearly powerful enough. I've read that 2.10 should bring big improvements. Also I'm not writing this to convince you (or your colleagues) to use scala instead of java, I am just trying to answer the scala part of your question :) –  Paolo Falabella Mar 13 '12 at 21:33
    
Yes, please don't get me wrong. I just wanted to clear my doubts about traits part. I don't treat it like an attempt to convince me in something :) –  Soteric Mar 14 '12 at 3:55

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