Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a script, which will print a timer and was trying to reuse a function like this:

def timer(m,x):
    for i in range(1,x):
        sys.stdout.write('\r%s\b%d' % (m,i))
        sys.stdout.flush()
        sleep(1)
        sys.stdout.write('\r  \b')

Now, the part of the script, where I want a timer to be displayed is like this:

host_alive = "ping -c1 myServer"
cmdStat, cmdOut = commands.getstatusoutput(host_alive)

while True:
    if cmdStat != 0:
        (cmdStat,cmdOut) = commands.getstatusoutput(host_alive)
        print "Still NOT ready!!"
    else:
        break

How can I print a timer without specifying a range()? Is there any workaround? Cheers!!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
def timer(m):
    i = 0
    while True:
        sys.stdout.write('\r%s\b%d' % (m,i))
        sys.stdout.flush()
        sleep(1)
        sys.stdout.write('\r  \b')
        i = i + 1
share|improve this answer
    
it's works just fine as a function, but doesn't really fit in my [sample] script. After the second commands.getstatusoutput() in the snippet, when I do like this: timer('Still NOT ready..... ') it never comes out of the loop and keep continue. Cheers!! –  MacUsers Mar 13 '12 at 18:21
    
Any idea how can I breakout of the timer(), when cmdStat becomes zero (0)? Cheers!! –  MacUsers Mar 13 '12 at 22:28
    
instead of "while True:" just write "while cmdStat != 0:" –  Asgeir Mar 14 '12 at 9:54

First of all commands module is deprecated and replaced by subprocess module.

Secondly, to represent infinity in python you can use float('inf'). Its symbolic that you are referring to infinity.

def timer(m): 
    i = 0
    while i<float('inf'): #this is symbolic and in essence similar to while True
        sys.stdout.write('\r%s\b%d' % (m,i))
        sys.stdout.flush()
        sleep(1)
        sys.stdout.write('\r  \b')
        i += 1
share|improve this answer
    
I know about the commands but it's an old script. Secondly, you did mean to say: i += 1 - right? –  MacUsers Mar 13 '12 at 21:49
    
Thats right. Typos –  jerrymouse Mar 14 '12 at 3:46

A while loop would probably be a better option here. Ex:

def timer(max):
    while counter > 0:
        print '%d seconds remain' % max
        sleep(1)
        max -= 1
share|improve this answer
    
it's not really to the infinity - is it? I wanted the timer to keep going until a certain condition is met. In your example, the upper limit needs to specified, which is completely opposite to me requirement. Cheers!! –  MacUsers Mar 13 '12 at 17:54
1  
Counting down to infinity makes no sense what so ever. Unless you mean your timer to go in to negative values. –  Silas Ray Mar 13 '12 at 18:08
    
Well, that's true! I didn't really mean literately infinity and especially countdown but just a timer to run until a certain condition is met. I think I should set a limit for max-run time for the loop. The original post and the subject is corrected now. Cheers!! –  MacUsers Mar 13 '12 at 18:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.