Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a set of classes like this:

class A {
 public:
  int DoIt() {
     //common code
  }
};

class B : public A {
  int DoIt() {
    if (A::DoIt() == 1) {
      return 1;
    }
    else {
      // do b specific code
    }
  }
};

class C : public A {
  int DoIt() {
    if(A::DoIt()==1) {
      return 1;
    }
    else {
      // do c specific code
    }
  }
};

Is there a way I can avoid manually putting this code:

if (A::Doit() == 1) { return 1; } else {

in every class which is derived from A?

share|improve this question
1  
The correct syntax is class B : public A. C++ is not Java. –  KennyTM Mar 13 '12 at 17:39
    
@Justinᚅᚔᚈᚄᚒᚔ: OP is asking how to avoid typing if(A::Doit()==1) return 1; } else { in every subclass, not how to call A::Doit() without knowing A. The linked question isn't even related to inheritance. –  KennyTM Mar 13 '12 at 18:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Just separate the specific code to another method virtual method.

class A
{
public:
    int DoIt() /*final*/
    {
        // common code
        if (return_value == 1)
           return 1;
        else
           return DoIt_specific();
    }

private:
    virtual int DoIt_specific() = 0;
    // ^ or some "A"-specific actions if A cannot be abstract.
};

class B : public A
{
    virtual int DoIt_specific() /*override*/
    {
        // specific code for B
    }
};

This is known as the non-virtual interface idiom.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.