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I'm in a situation where I want to compare two binary files. One of them is already stored on the server with a pre-calculated Crc32 in the database from when I stored it originally.

I know that if the Crc is different then the files are definitely different. However, if the Crc is the same I don't know that the files are. So what I'm looking for is a nice efficient way of comparing the two streams on from the posted file and one from the file system.

I'm not an expert on streams but I'm well aware that I could easily shoot myself in the foot here as far as memory usage is concerned.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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5 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted
static bool FileEquals(string fileName1, string fileName2)
{
    // Check the file size and CRC equality here.. if they are equal...    
    using (var file1 = new FileStream(fileName1, FileMode.Open))
        using (var file2 = new FileStream(fileName2, FileMode.Open))
            return StreamEquals(file1, file2);
}

static bool StreamEquals(Stream stream1, Stream stream2)
{
    const int bufferSize = 2048;
    byte[] buffer1 = new byte[bufferSize]; //buffer size
    byte[] buffer2 = new byte[bufferSize];
    while (true) {
        int count1 = stream1.Read(buffer1, 0, bufferSize);
        int count2 = stream2.Read(buffer2, 0, bufferSize);

        if (count1 != count2)
            return false;

        if (count1 == 0)
            return true;

        // You might replace the following with an efficient "memcmp"
        if (!buffer1.Take(count1).SequenceEqual(buffer2.Take(count2)))
            return false;
    }
}
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I sped up the "memcmp" by using a Int64 compare in a loop over the read stream chunks. This reduced time to about 1/4.

    private static bool StreamsContentsAreEqual(Stream stream1, Stream stream2)
    {
        const int bufferSize = 2048 * 2;
        var buffer1 = new byte[bufferSize];
        var buffer2 = new byte[bufferSize];

        while (true)
        {
            int count1 = stream1.Read(buffer1, 0, bufferSize);
            int count2 = stream2.Read(buffer2, 0, bufferSize);

            if (count1 != count2)
            {
                return false;
            }

            if (count1 == 0)
            {
                return true;
            }

            int iterations = (int)Math.Ceiling((double)count1 / sizeof(Int64));
            for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                if (BitConverter.ToInt64(buffer1, i * sizeof(Int64)) != BitConverter.ToInt64(buffer2, i * sizeof(Int64)))
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
    }
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Is this advantageous only for 64-bit CPUs or will this help on 32-bit CPUs as well? –  Pretzel Jan 24 '13 at 15:31
    
It should not matter if you have a 32-bit or 64-bit operating system running. But I never tried it on a pure 32-bit CPU. You have to try it and maybe just change Int64 to int32. But aren't most of more or less modern CPUs capable of 64-bit operations (x86 since 2004)? Go ahead and try it! –  Lars Jan 25 '13 at 8:56
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if you change that crc to a sha1 signature the chances of it being different but with the same signature are astronomicly small

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You should never rely on that in most serious apps. It's like just checking the hash in a hashtable lookup without comparing the actual keys! –  LeakyCode Jun 9 '09 at 9:14
1  
unfortunately you can guarantee that the one time it messes up will be absolutely critical, probably that one big pitch. –  Simon Farrow Jun 9 '09 at 9:17
    
@Simon - hehe very true. @Mehrdad - No probably not but it would greatly reduce the times you'd have to check to be super uber sure. –  albertjan Jun 9 '09 at 9:22
    
Take the CRC and say file size and the changes are ever smaller. –  kenny Apr 14 '10 at 12:34
2  
@MehrdadAfshari a rather serious app like git relies on exactly this. To quote Linus Torvalds we will "quite likely never ever see it in [collision of two files by comparing sha's] the full history of the universe". Cf. stackoverflow.com/questions/9392365/…. –  Maate May 8 '13 at 17:59
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You can check the length and dates of the two files even before checking the CRC to possibly avoid the CRC check.

But if you have to compare the entire file contents, one neat trick I've seen is reading the bytes in strides equal to the bitness of the CPU. For example, on a 32 bit PC, read 4 bytes at a time and compare them as int32's. On a 64 bit PC you can read 8 bytes at a time. This is roughly 4 or 8 times as fast as doing it byte by byte. You also would probably wanna use an unsafe code block so that you could use pointers instead of doing a bunch of bit shifting and OR'ing to get the bytes into the native int sizes.

You can use IntPtr.Size to determine the ideal size for the current processor architecture.

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Could you provide a code sample on how you would do that? –  Svish Jun 9 '09 at 9:25
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This is how i would do it if you didn't want to rely on crc

    /// <summary>
    /// Binary comparison of two files
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="fileName1">the file to compare</param>
    /// <param name="fileName2">the other file to compare</param>
    /// <returns>a value indicateing weather the file are identical</returns>
    public static bool CompareFiles(string fileName1, string fileName2)
    {
        FileInfo info1 = new FileInfo(fileName1);
        FileInfo info2 = new FileInfo(fileName1);
        bool same = info1.Length == info2.Length;
        if (same)
        {
            using (FileStream fs1 = info1.OpenRead())
            using (FileStream fs2 = info2.OpenRead())
            using (BufferedStream bs1 = new BufferedStream(fs1))
            using (BufferedStream bs2 = new BufferedStream(fs2))
            {
                for (long i = 0; i < info1.Length; i++)
                {
                    if (bs1.ReadByte() != bs2.ReadByte())
                    {
                        same = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return same;
    }
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