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I have a list of lists of three strings in Python, e.g.,

m = [['pig', 'quartz', '1'], ['pork', 'nails', '1'], ...]

and I want to sort it by index 0, then by index 2 in reverse order, then by index 1. At each step in the sort I'd like to maintain the order imposed by the other columns. For instance,

pork       barn         4
pork       barn2        4
pork       nails        1
pig        quartz       1
quinoa     pail         1
quinoa     quatern      1
quail      quatern      1
radish     barn         1
radish     barn2        1
radish     inbox        3
radish     snow         1

would become:

pig        quartz       1
pork       barn         4
pork       barn2        4
pork       nails        1
quail      quatern      1
quinoa     pail         1
quinoa     quatern      1
radish     inbox        3    <-
radish     barn         1
radish     barn2        1
radish     snow         1

that is, sort by the first column, then within each group of 1st columns (pig, pork, quail, ...), sort by the third column reversed, then within each group of 1st-column-3rd-column ((pig, 1), (pork, 4), (pork, 1), ...), sort by the second column.

How can I do this nicely? Conceptually, if operator.itemgetter() could encode sort order along with index, I would want something like m.sort(key=operator.itemgetter(0, -2, 1)).

share|improve this question
    
Is the third item always an integer? –  Avaris Mar 13 '12 at 18:04
    
@Avaris: Yes, it's always a string containing an int. –  wes Mar 13 '12 at 18:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a custom comparison function:

def compare_triples(a, b):
    ret=cmp(a[0], b[0])
    if ret: return ret
    ret=cmp(b[2], a[2])
    if ret: return ret
    return cmp(a[1], b[1])

for i in m: print i
print "-" * 79
m2=sorted(m, cmp=compare_triples)
for i in m2: print i

The compare function is not optimal and might be rewritten as:

def compare_triples(a, b):
    return cmp((a[0], b[2], a[1]), (b[0], a[2], b[1]))

As others have pointed out this will work too:

def sort_key(a):
    return a[0], -int(a[2]), a[1]

for i in sorted(m, key=sort_key): print i
share|improve this answer
    
That while loop is the wrong way to do it. Why wouldn't you just do ret=cmp(); if ret != 0: return ret? –  Haldean Brown Mar 13 '12 at 18:40
    
This is the most generic solution, given that all inputs are strings. –  wes Mar 13 '12 at 18:41
    
Yeah this felt clumsy while writing it, I've adjusted the code. –  hochl Mar 13 '12 at 19:25
def key(item):
    return item[0], -int(item[2]), item[1]
m.sort(key = key)

PS. The cmp keyword argument has been removed from Python3. For future compatibility you may wish to stick with key.

share|improve this answer
1  
-int(item[2])? –  Avaris Mar 13 '12 at 18:12
    
@Avaris: Yes, indeed. Thanks. –  unutbu Mar 13 '12 at 18:18

I would try something like this:

def sort_key(a, b, c):
   return (a, -int(c) , b)           

m.sort(key = lambda row: sort_key(*row))
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that all three columns are strings. –  wes Mar 13 '12 at 18:22
    
Sorry, updated, but if you need more generic thing, will have to use cmp instead. In any case, I'd rather use what unutbu says. –  bereal Mar 13 '12 at 18:29

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