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I've solved my problem, but because I have tried and failed to solve it before, and this time it took me a good deal of effort, I wanted to post the question, and if nobody has a better answer, my solution so I don't forget how to do this in the future, and to help anybody else facing a similar challenge. My challenge is this:

I have a function used to filter a list of options to return only those that are lot traced, and, when applicable, also only show items matching a specified pattern:

  Private Shared Function FilterResultsLot(ByVal source As IQueryable(Of Item), _
     ByVal itemCode As String) As IQueryable(Of Item)
     If HasFilter(itemCode, True) Then
        Return From row In source Where row.ItemDetail.IsLotTraced AndAlso _
               row.ItemCode.ToLower() Like itemCode.ToLower()
     Else
        Return From row In source Where row.ItemDetail.IsLotTraced
     End If
  End Function

Another requirement came up and I wanted to be able to generalize the lot traced criteria into a general filter, so I created this function:

  Private Shared Function FilterResults(source As IQueryable(Of Item), _
     itemCode As String, filter As Func(Of Item, Boolean)) As IQueryable(Of Item)
     Dim predicate As Func(Of Item, Boolean)
     If HasFilter(itemCode, True) Then
        predicate = Function(row) row.ItemCode.ToLower() Like itemCode.ToLower() AndAlso filter.Invoke(row)
     Else
        predicate = filter
     End If
     Return source.Where(predicate).AsQueryable()
  End Function

And that function works through LINQ-to-SQL, but it loses significant optimization. Whereas the first function would an execute SQL query ending with:

FROM [dbo].[OITM] AS [t0]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[FSE_ItemDetail] AS [t1] ON [t1].[ItemCode] = [t0].[ItemCode]
WHERE ([t1].[IsLotTraced] = 1) AND (LOWER([t0].[ItemCode]) LIKE @p0 ESCAPE ''~'')

The second would execute multiple SQL queries with these endings (and potentially many more):

FROM [dbo].[OITM] AS [t0]

FROM [dbo].[FSE_ItemDetail] AS [t0]
WHERE [t0].[ItemCode] = @p0',N'@p0 nvarchar(4000)',@p0=N'BF-BIKE'

FROM [dbo].[FSE_ItemDetail] AS [t0]
WHERE [t0].[ItemCode] = @p0',N'@p0 nvarchar(4000)',@p0=N'BF-BIKE-ITEM'

So the question is how to combine the LINQ-to-SQL delegate expressions into one without calling Invoke or AsQueryable, or without losing the optimal execution.

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If this were C#, I would try replacing all usages of Func<> with Expression<Func<>>, since the compiler can translate a lambda into either. Is this also true of VB? Can you assign an inline function expression to an Expression(Of Func(Of whatever)) ? –  AakashM Mar 13 '12 at 18:50
    
Yes, I think I tried that, but still didn't know how to invoke the expression. You'll notice the solution I came up with does exactly what you suggest, but also finds a way to "invoke" the expression (merge it into the Queryable's expression tree), which was the part I was missing. –  BlueMonkMN Mar 13 '12 at 19:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's my current solution. Please comment or provide better solutions if you have any:

  Private Shared Function FilterResults(source As IQueryable(Of Item), itemCode As String, filter As Expressions.Expression(Of Func(Of Item, Boolean))) As IQueryable(Of Item)
     If HasFilter(itemCode, True) Then
        Return Queryable.Where(Queryable.Where(source, Function(row) row.ItemCode.ToLower() Like itemCode.ToLower()), filter)
     Else
        Return Queryable.Where(source, filter)
     End If
  End Function

Edit:

After working with it a bit more, I prefer a simplification/alternative to this syntax:

Return Queryable.Where(Queryable.Where(source, _
   Function(row) row.ItemCode.ToLower() Like itemCode.ToLower()), filter)

My preference is:

Return Queryable.Where(From row in source _
   Where row.ItemCode.ToUpper() Like itemCode.ToUpper(), filter)

(I also suggest ToUpper instead of ToLower to force case-insensitive match on case-sensitive server because I've heard UPPER is better optimized for that.)

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