Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's the code that I've worked upon:

while ((lineContents = tempFileReader.readLine()) != null)
{
            String lineByLine = lineContents.replaceAll("/\\.", System.getProperty("line.separator")); //for matching /. and replacing it by new line
            changer.write(lineByLine);
            Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\r?\\n"); //Find new line
            Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(lineByLine);
            while(matcher.find())
            {
                Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("word"); //Finding the word required
                Matcher tagMatcher = tagFinder.matcher(lineByLine);
                while(tagMatcher.find())
                {
                    score++;
                }
                scoreTracker.add(score);
                    score = 0;
            }   
}

My sample input contains 6 lines, with occurences of word being [0,1,0,3,0,0] So when I print scoreTracker (which is an ArrayList) I want the above output. But instead, I get [4,4,4,4,4,4] which it the total occurence of the word, but not line by line. Kindly help.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

lineByLine points to the entire contents of your file. That is the reason you are getting [4,4,4,4,4,4]. You need to store each line in another variable line and then use tagFinder.find(line). Final code will look like this

while ((lineContents = tempFileReader.readLine()) != null)
{
    String lineByLine = lineContents.replaceAll("/\\.", System.getProperty("line.separator")); //for matching /. and replacing it by new line
    changer.write(lineByLine);
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(".*\\r?\\n"); //Find new line
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(lineByLine);
    while(matcher.find())
    {
        Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("word"); //Finding the word required
        //matcher.group() returns the input subsequence matched by the previous match.
        Matcher tagMatcher = tagFinder.matcher(matcher.group());
        while(tagMatcher.find())
        {
            score++;
        }
        scoreTracker.add(score);
            score = 0;
    }   
}
share|improve this answer
    
But that is the reason why I'm finding a new line first in my String and then applying to the result my score. The while loop for matcher ? Am I wrong with that? –  Kazekage Gaara Mar 13 '12 at 18:42
    
@KazekageGaara There are two issues in your code. One is that the first regex pattern is for finding a new line delimiter. It does not capture the line itself. So you need to change the regex to (.*)\\r?\\n. Secondly you are invoking matcher.find() and you are not calling matcher.group() anywhere to extract the match. Make these two changes and it should be fine. More info about Matcher object here docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/regex/… –  Narendra Yadala Mar 13 '12 at 18:46
    
Thank You ! :-) –  Kazekage Gaara Mar 13 '12 at 19:05

Maybe this code will help you:

    String str = "word word\n \n word word\n \n word\n";
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("(.*)\\r?\\n"); //Find new line
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(str);
    while(matcher.find())
    {
        Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("word"); //Finding the word required
        Matcher tagMatcher = tagFinder.matcher(matcher.group());
        int score = 0;
        while(tagMatcher.find())
        {
            score++;
        }
        System.out.print(score + " ");
    }

The output is 2 0 2 0 1 It is not highly optimized, but your problem was that you never restricted the inner matching and it always scanned the whole line.

share|improve this answer

This is because each time you are searching the same string (lineByLine). what you probably intended was to search each line separately. I suggest you do:

    Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("word"); //Finding the word required
    for(String line : lineByLine.split("\\n")
    {
        Matcher tagMatcher = tagFinder.matcher(line);
        while(tagMatcher.find())
            score++;
        scoreTracker.add(score);
        score = 0;
    }
share|improve this answer

The original code was reading the input one line at a time using tempFileReader.readLine() and then looking for end of lines within each line using matcher. Since lineContents contains only one line, matcher never finds a new line so the rest of the code is skipped. Why do you need two different bits of code to split the input into lines? You could remove one of the bits of code relating to finding the new lines. E.g.

while ((lineContents = tempFileReader.readLine()) != null)
{
      Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("word"); //Finding the word required
      Matcher tagMatcher = tagFinder.matcher(lineContents);
      while(tagMatcher.find())
      {
          score++;
      }
      scoreTracker.add(score);
      score = 0;

}

I've tried the code above using a file test.txt on Windows read by a BufferedReader. E.g.

BufferedReader tempFileReader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("c:\\test\\test.txt"));

scoreTracker contains [0, 1, 0, 3, 0, 0] for a file which has the content you describe. I don't understand how you got [4,4,4,4,4,4] out of the original code if the sample input is an actual file as described and tempFileReader is a BufferedReader. It would be useful to see the code you use to set up tempFileReader.

share|improve this answer

You can use Scanner class. You initialize the Scanner to the string you want to count and then just count how many these tokens Scanner finds.

And you can initialize Scanner directly with the FileInputStream.

The resulting code has only 9 lines:

File file = new File(fileName);
Scanner scanner = new Scanner(file);
scanner.useDelimiter("your text here");
int occurences;
while(scanner.hasNext()){
     scanner.next();
     occurences++;
}
scanner.close();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.