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How is it possible to encode black/white picture into ".wav"-file? I know that it is possible for sure with help of "stenography". But I don't know it's algorithms. What algorithms exist? And what books/sources are the best for understanding of their principles?


Edited:

Actually I have stereo wav-file. My task is to decode pictures from it. The task says, that frequencies of the left channel show the X-coordinate, frequencies of the right channel show the Y-coordinate of Cartesian coordinate system. These points compose the picture with the text-message. So, I must to write programm for this. I haven't any idea what should I do.

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what do you mean by "converting to a wav file"? do you want filters to miss the fact that it's a picture? do you want to convert it to the wave domain? what is your purpose in doing that? –  Not_a_Golfer Mar 13 '12 at 19:25
    
I guess, I should to encode the picture into existing wav-file. –  Lucky Man Mar 13 '12 at 19:29
    
How about save black spot xy in left sound channel, white spot xy in right? –  PasteBT Mar 13 '12 at 19:29
    
Actually I have a stereo wav-file. My task is to decode picture from it. The task says, that frequencies of the left channel show the X-coordinate, frequencies of the right channel show the Y-coordinate of Cartesian coordinate system. These points compose the picture with the text-message. I haven't any idea what should I do. –  Lucky Man Mar 13 '12 at 19:36

2 Answers 2

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Probably the simplest version of steganography using a wav file would be to use 16-bit samples in the wave file, but only dedicate the 15 most significant bits to sound. In the least significant bit of each sample, you'd encode one pixel of your black and white picture.

Regenerating the picture would require software to open the wave file, take the least significant bit from each sample, and put those bits back together with each other into (for example) a JPEG file.

To put things into perspective, a CD has two channels containing 16 bit samples at a rate of 44.1 KHz, so you'd only need the LSBs from around 10 seconds of sound to encode a fairly typical full-color JPEG (e.g., 100KB or so). A wave file of a typical ~3 minute pop song could hide around 15-20 full-color pictures pretty easily.

Edit: (to reply to edited answer). This is a little tougher to deal with. An individual sample can't represent any frequency; it just represents the amplitude at a given point in time. To get frequency, you need a number of samples over a period of time -- and you need to know the exact period to convert.

Once you know that, you basically do an FFT on the samples. That will tell you the relative strengths of signal at all possible frequencies. Presumably, you'd pick the strongest one and scale appropriately. Do the same for the other channel and draw a pixel at that point.

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I tried FFT, but it was unsuccessfully. So, may be some standart algorithms exist? It is just a simple test task. –  Lucky Man Mar 13 '12 at 20:00
    
"you need a number of samples over a period of time -- and you need to know the exact period to convert." - How can I find out this period? –  Lucky Man Mar 13 '12 at 20:16
    
@LuckyMan: while you probably could reverse engineer it, if you aren't told what it is, it'll be fairly difficult to find. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 13 '12 at 20:17
    
There is a wav file with two channels, how to determine the period of each channel, which is better to use FFT? –  Lucky Man Mar 13 '12 at 20:34

Your ears are not sensitive to small changes in sound file.

Wav files are UNCOMPRESSED data so its just a file of 16-24bit characters. Your ears cannot notice slight differences betweeen bits. All you need to do is periodically inject bit values that represent an image in the data.

So if you insert one pixel for every 1000 data points you can hide an image (without even encrypting it) in a wave file. If a user plays the file they CANNOT hear it.

When you save the file on your computer or computer afar you can use a decoding tool that is aware of the hiding techinque.

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