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I'm trying to implement my own version of vector class without using iterators. Here is the parts which may be needed for the question.

template <typename T>
class Vector {
public:
    ...

    ~Vector()
    {
        delete [] m_data;
    }

    ...

    void erase(size_t position)
    {
        if (position >= m_size) {
            throw std::out_of_range("erasing an element out of bounds");
        }
        --m_size;
        for (size_t i = position; i < m_size; ++i) {
            m_data[i] = m_data[i + 1];
        }
        m_data[m_size].T::~T();
    }

    ...

private:
    T* m_data;
    size_t m_size;
    ...
};

Below is a quote from cplusplus.com for erase function of std::vector:

This effectively reduces the vector size by the number of elements removed, calling each element's destructor before.

So I tried to implement the same functionality by calling the destructor of the last duplicate element. The destructor of m_data[position] is unnecessary as it will be replaced by the next element.

The problem is that the code in the destructor of vector class delete [] m_data will also call the destructors for each element which will cause double deletion of memory and crash.

Can anyone help to write the correct erase function for my vector class?

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3  
You shouldn't use array-new at all. Instead, make like std::vector does and allocate raw memory and construct the objects in place. –  Kerrek SB Mar 13 '12 at 20:13
    
@KerrekSB I tried to implement simple version for dealing with heap memory and right implementation of functions for working with it. The class is written for learning purposes and supposed to use memory allocation/deallocation with new/delete. I'm using reserved memory which doubles each time it reaches the maximum. –  Artak Begnazaryan Mar 13 '12 at 20:27
    
So what? The point is that array-new constructs objects, and most likely that's not what you want if you want to control object construction yourself. –  Kerrek SB Mar 13 '12 at 20:28
    
@KerrekSB you were right. I just didn't get your idea first time I read it. So I also come up to the solution to allocate and use raw memory and construct the objects in place instad of using new/delete. Thanks. –  Artak Begnazaryan Mar 16 '12 at 7:38
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5 Answers

What you are trying doesn't fly that easily! If you want to implement something like std::vector<T> you need to do the full monty: you need to deal with raw memory and construct/destroy objects explicitly. That is, you need to allocate a sufficient chunk of uninitialized memory, construct/destroy object at their appropriate locations as needed, and eventually release the allocated memory. It is an interesting exercise to do for toy version of std::vector<T> and then you'll gladly use version shipping with your compiler because it somehow managed to be faster, actually implement all of the functionality, and is reasonably bug free. Of course, if you happen to implement a version of the standard C++ library you'll need to suffer through the entire exercise. The good news is: std::vector<T> is trivial compared to std::deque<T> which I'd be prepared to bet big bucks you won't get anywhere nearly as efficient as a standard library version without the use of algorithms (and to get this really efficient you'd need fairly complex version of the algorithms as well; I'm not sure if there are many implementations which actually do specialized versions which are good on std::deque<T>).

Not using iterators for this is, BTW, just not helpful: algorithms like std::move() (the version taking iterators as arguments) or std::copy() (if you don't use C++2011) avoid littering your code with duplicated versions. Having the code in algorithms has the added advantage that they not entirely trivial logic is nicely encapsulated as needed. Putting the repeatedly needed code into algorithms makes the implementation of the containers comparatively simple, giving the implementation a much better chance of being correct. ... not to mention that it is actually viable to implement interesting optimizations as well.

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Of course I know all the good of standard containers, iterators and algorithms and using them every day. I'm not trying to replace them or enhance. All I want now is to do some experiments and write my own simple version of vector class which will cover the basic functionality. –  Artak Begnazaryan Mar 13 '12 at 20:39
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@Artak don't forget to do your bounds checking the other direction (in erase)

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What do you mean by other direction? position is of type size_t which is an unsigned integer so guaranteed to be >= 0. –  Artak Begnazaryan Mar 13 '12 at 21:06
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How about replacing m_data[m_size].T::~T(); with m_data[m_size] = T(); ?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I come up to a solution to not use new/delete operators but use C-style malloc/free instead. This is because new and delete operators are calling constructors and destructors implicitly and you don’t have a control over them. Instead if we use malloc/free then we can explicitly call constructors/desctuctors for the objects when we need it.

So in this example we can explicitly call the destructor for the last object in erase function and also for each element in desctuctor of vector class.

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What you want to is make the array of char.

Then you can use placement new to put elements into your vector and when the element is deleted explicitly call the destructor.

   void push_back(T const& el)
   {
       makeSureThereIsSpaceForOneMore();
       new (&E[m_size]) T(el);
       ++m_size;
   }
   void erase(size_t index)
   {
       MoveStuffAround();
       E(index)->~T();
       --m_size;
   }

private:
    char* m_data;
    size_t m_size;
    ...

    T* E(size_t index){return reinterpret_cast<T*>(&m_data[index * sizeof(T)]);}
};
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I think that keeping char * instead of T* will just complicate the code so casting will be needed in each function. And this will not actually solve the problem as the double deletion will occur anyway. –  Artak Begnazaryan Mar 15 '12 at 18:45
    
@ArtakBegnazaryan: Its how std::vector is implemented. And the only real way of doing it. Why will it not resolve the double deletion? –  Loki Astari Mar 15 '12 at 19:20
    
If we keep T* m_data instead of char* m_data the code would look like this: void push_back(const T& el) { makeSureThereIsSpaceForMore(); new (&m_data[m_size]) T(el); ++m_size; } void erase(size_t index) { MoveStaffAround(); m_data[m_size].T::~T(); --m_size; } This is more simpler than the one with char *. Another key point you didn't mentioned in your answer that we should use C-style malloc/free memory allocation for reserving/freeing the memory. –  Artak Begnazaryan Mar 15 '12 at 20:09
    
It's easy to convert the above so no casts are needed by writing a method to get a particular element. So you argument that your code is neater is false. I dislike the idea of adding calls to malloc() and free() into a C++ code base. A lot of build systems already check and reject such code because the mixing of new/delete malloc/free within the same application leads to problems unless you are very careful. But it is an option. –  Loki Astari Mar 15 '12 at 20:53
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