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I'm experimenting/learning with java and json. I'm trying to make my own data for a json parser and I can't figure out what datatype the example data it gives me is. I think it's a datetime, but I don't know how to get my date (regular format) to the json date format. I'm coding the example using PHP.

Jsonp Example Data:

[1110844800000,178.61],
[1110931200000,175.60],
[1111017600000,179.29],

My Date and Data format:

2012-03-01 18:21:31,42
2012-03-01 18:22:31,46
2012-03-02 18:21:31,40

Does anyone know if the 13 digit date/time json above is a datetime specific to java or json? And if so, how to get my data to that format?

Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It looks like the Javascript version of Unix time, which is really just Unix time in milliseconds rather than seconds.

Divide your 13-digit numbers by 1000 and run them through this site to verify: http://www.onlineconversion.com/unix_time.htm

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Each of what you've quoted is an array with two entries. The first entry in each array might be a datetime. If so:

1110844800000 = Tue, 15 Mar 2005 00:00:00 GMT
1110931200000 = Wed, 16 Mar 2005 00:00:00 GMT
1111017600000 = Thu, 17 Mar 2005 00:00:00 GMT

JavaScript stores date/times as milliseconds since The Epoch (midnight on 1 Jan 1970 GMT), so to convert to Date instances:

var dt = new Date(1110844800000);

...which is how I got the values above.

No idea what the second entry in each array is. It looks like a currency (money) figure.

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‘-1110844800000’ is number of milliseconds from January 1, 1970 and ‘-178.61’ is time offset.

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Your first array is Unix Time in milliseconds like gregheo said.

If you want to convert your Unix timestamp in JAVA, you can find a good example there :

Convert UNIX Timestamp to DT

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