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I have tried;

void *malloc(unsigned int);
struct deneme {
    const int a = 15;
    const int b = 16;
};

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    struct deneme *mydeneme = malloc(sizeof(struct deneme));
    return 0;
}

And this is the compiler's error:

gereksiz.c:3:17: error: expected ':', ',', ';', '}' or '__attribute__' before '=' token

And, also this;

void *malloc(unsigned int);
struct deneme {
    const int a;
    const int b;
};

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    struct deneme *mydeneme = malloc(sizeof(struct deneme));
    mydeneme->a = 15;
    mydeneme->b = 20;
    return 0;
}

And this is the compiler's error:

gereksiz.c:10:5: error: assignment of read-only member 'a'
gereksiz.c:11:5: error: assignment of read-only member 'b'

And neither got compiled. Is there any way to initialize a const variable inside a struct when allocation memory with malloc?

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2  
Did you run the compiler? –  Kerrek SB Mar 13 '12 at 20:20
    
@KerrekSB of course. –  yasar Mar 13 '12 at 20:21
4  
Oh, OK. Did it say anything? –  Kerrek SB Mar 13 '12 at 20:22
    
@KerrekSB see my edits. –  yasar Mar 13 '12 at 20:25
    
You have to cast away constness: *(int*)(&mydeneme->a)=15; –  n.m. Mar 13 '12 at 20:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to cast away the const to initialize the fields of a malloc'ed structure:

struct deneme *mydeneme = malloc(sizeof(struct deneme));
*(int *)&mydeneme->a = 15;
*(int *)&mydeneme->b = 20;

Alternately, you can create an initialized version of the struct and memcpy it:

struct deneme deneme_init = { 15, 20 };
struct deneme *mydeneme = malloc(sizeof(struct deneme));
memcpy(mydeneme, &deneme_init, sizeof(struct deneme));

You can make deneme_init static and/or global if you do this a lot (so it only needs to be built once).


Explanation of why this code is not undefined behaviour as suggested by some of the comments, using C11 standard references:

  • This code does not violate 6.7.3/6 because the space returned by malloc is not "an object defined with a const-qualified type". The expression mydeneme->a is not an object, it is an expression. Although it has const-qualified type, it denotes an object which was not defined with a const-qualified type (in fact, not defined with any type at all).

  • The strict aliasing rule is never violated by writing into space allocated by malloc, because the effective type (6.5/6) is updated by each write.

(The strict aliasing rule can be violated by reading from space allocated by malloc however).

In Chris's code samples, the first one sets the effective type of the integer values to int, and the second one sets the effective type to const int, however in both cases going on to read those values through *mydeneme is correct because the strict-aliasing rule (6.5/7 bullet 2) permits reading an object through an expression which is equally or more qualified than the effective type of the object. Since the expression mydeneme->a has type const int, it can be used to read objects of effective type int and const int.

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7  
Isn't the const-cast access undefined behaviour? –  Kerrek SB Mar 13 '12 at 20:40
7  
Very undefined. –  Jonathan Grynspan Mar 13 '12 at 20:42
4  
No -- const cast is well defined if the memory in question is not const (such as what comes back from malloc). It only undefined if you try to modify a const object via the cast. –  Chris Dodd Mar 13 '12 at 20:47
    
No it's defined, it just means that programmer takes responsibility and knows what is he(sorry ladies) doing. My teacher use to say that one can easily shoot into his leg thought. –  AoeAoe Mar 13 '12 at 22:41
    
Standard says: (6.7.3) If an attempt is made to modify an object defined with a const-qualified type through use of an lvalue with non-const-qualified type, the behavior is undefined. and in undefined behaviour section: An attempt is made to modify an object defined with a const-qualified type through use of an lvalue with non-const-qualified type (6.7.3). That would make this example exhibit ub. –  this May 23 '14 at 12:35

Have you tried to do like this:

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    struct deneme mydeneme = { 15, 20 };
    struct deneme *pmydeneme = malloc(sizeof(struct deneme));
    memcpy(pmydeneme, &mydeneme , sizeof(mydeneme));
    return 0;
}

I have not tested but the code seems correct

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Interesting I found this C99 way is working in clang but not in gcc

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    struct deneme *pmydeneme = malloc(sizeof(struct deneme));
    *pmydeneme = (struct deneme) {15, 20};
    return 0;
}
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Welcome to Stack Overflow! This should perhaps have been a comment, but if you have a new question, please ask it by clicking the Ask Question button; you may want to include a link to this one for context. –  Nathan Tuggy Feb 18 at 0:58
    
@NathanTuggy it looks like an answer to me –  Matt McNabb Feb 18 at 0:59
    
@MattMcNabb: Perhaps so; the "doesn't work in gcc" mention threw me off. –  Nathan Tuggy Feb 18 at 1:14
    
After further checking... this code is incorrect. *pmydeneme is not a modifiable lvalue (C11 6.3.2/1) because it is a struct with a const-qualified member. The assignment operator (6.5.16/2) requires a modifiable lvalue as the left operand. If clang accepts it then it is a bug in clang. –  Matt McNabb Feb 18 at 1:22
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  SMR Feb 18 at 7:44

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