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How can I mock a method with two signatures?

sudo code:

public Class ClassA{
  //... do stuff
}

public Class ClassB{
  //... do stuff
}

public Class BigClass
{
  public BigClass(){}

  public ClassB MapMe(ClassA a)
  {
     //... do stuff
     return new ClassB();
  }

  public ClassA MapMe(ClassB a)  
  {
     //... do stuff    
     return new ClassA();
  }
}

public Class ClassToTest
{
  public void DoSomething()
  {
     var ResultA = BigClass.MapMe(new ClassA());

     //... do some more stuff

     ResultA = BigClass.MapMe(new ClassB());
  }
}

Apologies for the poor code example, doing this on IPad, but hopefully gives you the idea.

share|improve this question
4  
It's not clear why the obvious answer isn't just "the same way you mock a class with one signature" (or ideally an interface, of course). I suggest you delete this question, then wait until you're at a computer where you can really write a good question, with a proper example, showing what you've tried and what happened. –  Jon Skeet Mar 13 '12 at 20:53
    
grumpy, guess I should stick to LinkedIn developers forum people seem to be able to understand that in hotel rooms, you may only have your memory and an iPad. –  Peter Agambar Mar 14 '12 at 8:34
5  
But in that case, is it so incredibly urgent that you get an answer right now? You can't test or use it anyway - so why not be considerate to people who are trying to answer the question, and wait until you've got time to do it properly? Please read tinyurl.com/so-hints –  Jon Skeet Mar 14 '12 at 8:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just use Argument Constraints

Argument constraints also define the method's signature by specifying the arguments types. That's why they can't be omitted.

mock.Expect(x => x.MapMe(Arg<ClassB>.Is.Anything).Return(resultB);
mock.Expect(x => x.MapMe(Arg<ClassA>.Is.Anything).Return(resultA);

EDIT:

I believe an other issue you faced - you've mocked BigClass without backing interface so obviously RhinoMocks does not allow setting expectations on such a mock. So just abstract a BigClass by interface and mock based on it:

public interface IMapper
{
    ClassB MapMe(ClassA entity);
    ClassA MapMe(ClassB entity);
}

public class BigClass : IMapper


[Test]
public void MapperTest()
{
    // !!! Below I've used WhenCalled() to show you that correct  
    // expectation is called based on argument type, just see in debugger
    IMapper mapperMock = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IMapper>();
    mapperMock.Expect(x => x.MapMe(Arg<ClassA>.Is.Anything))
              .WhenCalled((mi) =>
                        {
                            Debug.WriteLine("MapMe - ClassA parameter");
                        })
              .Return(null /*TODO: return correct instance*/);
    mapperMock.Expect(x => x.MapMe(Arg<ClassB>.Is.Anything))
              .WhenCalled((mi) =>
                        {
                            Debug.WriteLine("MapMe - ClassB parameter");
                        })
              .Return(null /*TODO: return correct instance*/);

    var resultB = mapperMock.MapMe(new ClassA());
    var resultA = mapperMock.MapMe(new ClassB());

   // TODO: Asserts
}
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks, should have said that I tried this and it failed, can't remember the error just now, but will add it when I get to work in the morning. –  Peter Agambar Mar 13 '12 at 23:19
    
also tried a few other, will add these in the morning too, save repeating the tested ways. Can't remember exactly where the error was, but think it wa in the replayAll. –  Peter Agambar Mar 13 '12 at 23:22
    
I believe you mocked class without backing interface, see updated answer. Anyway please add actual code you re using since it is hard to assume –  sll Mar 14 '12 at 7:18
    
Many thanks, hadn't thought about using WhenCalled, will give it a go, but definitely a way forward. BTW please assume that the dummy classes have interfaces, I just haven't put them on there. also using ForGeneric.Create<ClassA, ClassB>().Create; –  Peter Agambar Mar 14 '12 at 8:42
1  
I've used WhenCalled() just to illustrate that correct expectation was called, but tou can just use Expect(..).Return(..) as I've initially did –  sll Mar 14 '12 at 8:59

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