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I have some problem with catching a ClassCastException. It happens in last case of the pattern matching of the retrieve function, the exception isn't cought.

How can I fix this?

  abstract class Property

  object EmptyProperty extends Property

  class PropertyCompanion[T]

  object Type extends PropertyCompanion[Type]
  case class Type extends Property

  object Name extends PropertyCompanion[Name]
  case class Name extends Property

  abstract class Entity {
    protected val properties: Map[PropertyCompanion[_], Property]
    def retrieve[T](key: PropertyCompanion[T]) =
      properties.get(key) match {
        case Some(x) => x match {
          case EmptyProperty => throw new Exception("empty property")
          case _ => {
            try {
              x.asInstanceOf[T]
            } catch {
              case e => throw new Exception("fubar")
            }
          }
        }
        case None => throw new Exception("not found")
      }
  }

  case class Book(protected val properties: Map[PropertyCompanion[_], Property]) extends Entity {
    def getType = retrieve(Type)
    def getName = retrieve(Name)
  }

  object Test extends App {

    val book = Book(Map(Type -> Type(), Name -> Type()))
    val name = book.getName
  }
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't catch the Exception, because you can't cast to T. The JVM does not know T at runtime, so you have to trick it a bit ;-). Pass in an implicit m: CLassManifest[T] to your method and use m.erasure.cast(x). Your could would look like this:

abstract class Property

object EmptyProperty extends Property

class PropertyCompanion[T]

object Type extends PropertyCompanion[Type]
case class Type extends Property

object Name extends PropertyCompanion[Name]
case class Name extends Property

abstract class Entity {
  protected val properties: Map[PropertyCompanion[_], Property]
  def retrieve[T](key: PropertyCompanion[T])(implicit m: ClassManifest[T]) =
    properties.get(key) match {
      case Some(x) => x match {
        case EmptyProperty => throw new Exception("empty property")
        case _ => {
          try {
            m.erasure.cast(x).asInstanceOf[T]
          } catch {
            case e => throw new Exception("fubar")
          }
        }
      }
      case None => throw new Exception("not found")
    }
}

case class Book(protected val properties: Map[PropertyCompanion[_], Property]) extends Entity {
  def getType = retrieve(Type)
  def getName = retrieve(Name)
}

object Test extends App {

  val book = Book(Map(Type -> Type(), Name -> Type()))
  val name = book.getName
}

edit: added a cast to T to get the correct return type

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. So there is no way to this without using the Manifest? Does it bring performance costs? –  roelio Mar 13 '12 at 21:46
    
I also still have to return result.asInstanceOf[T] because else it returns the Any type –  roelio Mar 13 '12 at 21:49
    
You are right, I see the same behaviour, which is strange, because the javadoc for Class[T] show this notation: T cast(Object obj). I don't think there is another way, because that is how scala tricks the type erasure. There should be no more performance costs than an additional object allocation. –  drexin Mar 13 '12 at 22:25
    
@drexin That may be, but m.erasure does not return Class[T]. –  Daniel C. Sobral Mar 13 '12 at 23:24
    
Ah, you are right. Thanks for clarification. –  drexin Mar 14 '12 at 6:55

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