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I have Perl code, which looks messy:

         my $x = $h->[1];
         foreach my $y (keys %$x) {
           my $ax = $x->{$y};
           foreach my $ay (keys %$ax) {
             if (ref($ax->{$ay}) eq 'JE::Object::Proxy') {
               my $bx = $ax->{$ay};
               if ($$bx->{class_info}->{name} eq 'HTMLImageElement') {
                 print $$bx->{value}->{src}, "\n";
               }
             }
           }
         }

Is it possible to optimize the code above to not use any variables, just $h, as that one is an input?

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Can you provide your sample input hash structure? –  daa Mar 14 '12 at 13:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's my crack at it:

print $$_->{value}{src}, "\n" for grep {
    ref $_ eq 'JE::Object::Proxy' &&
    $$_->{class_info}{name} eq 'HTMLImageElement'
} map {
    values %$_
} values %{ $h->[1] };
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Wow! Nice code! –  Ωmega Mar 13 '12 at 21:41

Just removing the helper variables is easy, something like this should do it:

foreach my $y (keys %{$h->[1]}) {
  foreach my $ax (%{$h->[1]->{$y}) {
    foreach my $ay (keys %$ax) {
      if(ref($h->[1]->{$y}->{$ay}) eq 'JE::Object::Proxy') {
        if($h->[1]->{$y}->{$ay}->{class_info}->{name} eq 'HTMLImageElement') {
          print $h->[1]->{$y}->{$ay}->{value}->{src}, "\n";
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

You could also remove the duplicated if:

foreach my $y (keys %{$h->[1]}) {
  foreach my $ax (%{$h->[1]->{$y}) {
    foreach my $ay (keys %$ax) {
      if(ref($h->[1]->{$y}->{$ay}) eq 'JE::Object::Proxy' && $h->[1]->{$y}->{$ay}->{class_info}->{name} eq 'HTMLImageElement') {
        print $h->[1]->{$y}->{$ay}->{value}->{src}, "\n";
      }
    }
  }
}

But I don't really see how to make it more readable: it is a iteration over a three dimensional structure.

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2  
A hint: code becomes almost always more readable by switching from procedural to declarative. Data::DPath dives into Perl data structures, similar like XPath does for XML. –  daxim Mar 13 '12 at 21:26

A lot of the "messiness" can be cleaned up by reducing your line count and minimizing how much nested code you have. Use the each command to get the next key and its associated value from the hash in one line. [EDIT: as Axeman pointed out, you really only need the values, so I'm replacing my use of each with values]. Also, use a pair of next statement to skip the print statement.

for my $ax (values %{$h->[1]} ) {
    for my $bx (values %$ax ) {
        next unless ref($bx) eq 'JE::Object::Proxy';
        next unless $$bx->{class_info}->{name} eq 'HTMLImageElement';
        print "$$bx->{value}->{src}\n";
    }
}
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+1 this is the only solution I can understand without staring at it for a while. Well done –  Borodin Mar 13 '12 at 23:09

You're using keys, when you really just want values.

foreach my $h ( grep { ref() eq 'HASH' } values %$x ) { 
    foreach my $obj ( 
        grep {   ref()                  eq 'JE::Object::Proxy' 
             and $_->{class_info}{name} eq 'HTMLImageElement' 
             } values %$h 
        ) { 
        say $obj->{value}{src};
    }
}
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