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I have been trying to optimize one of my queries which looks like:

select toc.* from
    (select sender, max(convid) as maxconvid
     from MetaTable 
     where sender in ('arjunchow','aamir_alam')
     group by sender) as tmp1
    inner join MetaTable as toc on 
        toc.sender = tmp1.sender 
        and toc.convid = tmp1.maxconvid;

When the mysql server is under stress, this query normally responds within 0.2 sec, but when the number of "sender" ids in the IN clause increase (>50), the query slows down terribly (~5-6 sec).

Is it advisable to use multiple union clauses instead of an IN clause given that my query may become a union of 50 queries. So my query will look like :

(SELECT 
    convId, 
    UNIX_TIMESTAMP(timeStamp) as timeStamp, 
    UNIX_TIMESTAMP(createTime) as createTime, 
    numMessages, 
    rootMsg, 
    sender, 
    ipormobile, 
    modIpOrMobile, 
    UNIX_TIMESTAMP(modTimeStamp) as modTimeStamp 
 from 
    MetaTable 
 where 
    sender='arjunchow' 
 ORDER BY convId DESC limit 1) 
UNION ALL 
(SELECT 
    convId, 
    UNIX_TIMESTAMP(timeStamp) as timeStamp, 
    UNIX_TIMESTAMP(createTime) as createTime, 
    numMessages, 
    rootMsg, 
    sender, 
    ipormobile, 
    modIpOrMobile, 
    UNIX_TIMESTAMP(modTimeStamp) as modTimeStamp 
 from 
    MetaTable 
 where 
    sender='aamir_alam' 
 ORDER BY convId DESC limit 1)
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An EXPLAIN output would be good. –  Robert Munteanu Jun 9 '09 at 10:18
    
Someone who actually knows MySQL might want to confirm this but in other SQL platforms IN is incredibly expensive and non-scaling because the parser has to check against every instance in the array. Almost everything done with an IN can be done better with exists and/or joins. –  annakata Jun 9 '09 at 10:22
    
In my experience IN(...) clauses are fine in MySQL. Subqueries are not ( see my answer ). –  Robert Munteanu Jun 9 '09 at 10:23
1  
@annakata: Subqueries are bad in MySQL in sense that this query: (SELECT * FROM long_table) LIMIT 1 will first select everything from the long table and then apply the limit. Since the @op's query needs all values from the subquery anyway, subquery is not bad here. MySQL (and every other RDBMS of the big four) is able to push the predicate into an IN/NOT IN query, converting it into EXISTS / NOT EXISTS. Since the query is key preserved here, this is also not the case. What matters here is almost sure the absence of index on (sender, convid) –  Quassnoi Jun 9 '09 at 10:32

2 Answers 2

I had a similar issue with tag searching and actually had the opportunity to talk to MySQL techs about it; they recommended that I create a temporary table and add my values to that as you loop through the users then perform any operations you need to on that temp table. Any time you try to pack this much into a single command, it's going to get seriously bogged down.

share|improve this answer

Rewrite your query as following:

SELECT  *
FROM    MetaTable
WHERE   (sender, convid) IN
        (
        SELECT  sender, MAX(convid) as maxconvid
        FROM    MetaTable
        WHERE   sender IN ('arjunchow','aamir_alam')
        GROUP BY
                sender
        )

, make sure you have a composite index on (sender, convid) and make sure it's used (i. e. there is USING INDEX FOR GROUP BY in the explain plan)

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