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t = [
       [
         [["Armando", "P"],["Dave", "S"]],
         [["Richard", "R"],["Michael", "S"]],
       ],
       [
         [["Allen", "S"],["Omer", "P"]],
         [["David E.", "R"], ["Richard X.", "P"]]
       ]
    ]

def rps_game_winner(game)
    raise WrongNumberOfPlayersError unless game.length == 2
    if (game[0][1] =~ /[r]/i && game[1][1] =~ /[s]/i) || (game[0][1] =~ /[s]/i && game[1][1] =~ /[p]/i) || (game[0][1] =~ /[p]/i && game[1][1] =~ /[r]/i)
        return game[0]
    elsif (game[0][1] =~ /[r]/i && game[1][1] =~ /[p]/i) || (game[0][1] =~ /[s]/i && game[1][1] =~ /[r]/i) || (game[0][1] =~ /[p]/i && game[1][1] =~ /[s]/i)
        return game[1]
    elsif game[0][1] == game[1][1]
        return game[0]
    else
        raise NoSuchStrategyError.new
    end
end

def rps_tournament_winner(t)
   t.each do |pair|
    yield pair
   end  
end

rps_tournament_winner(t) { |x| rps_game_winner(x)  }

So the error I am getting is: NoSuchStrategyError: NoSuchStrategyError - which means that the yield is passing a value to the block and that is being passed to my method rps_game_winner and it is evaluating something and giving that error - per the method.

But it's not evaluating it properly....because it should be looking at Armando and Dave and returning a winner, then it should go back and continue look at the next pair and return the winner, etc.

P.S. When I do puts pair, I see the right values - and I have tested rps_game_winner method on one single pair and it works fine. It's just iterating over multiple pairs is giving me an issue with the passing of control back and forth.

share|improve this question
1  
I think you want to raise WrongNumberOfPlayers.new, not WrongNumberOfPlayers (the class). –  Linuxios Mar 13 '12 at 21:35
    
possible duplicate of Getting yield to work on nested arrays of arrays - Ruby –  Mark Thomas Mar 13 '12 at 23:46
    
@Linux_iOS.rb.cpp.c.lisp.m.sh: No, he doesn't. While both work, and both are in fact semantically the same, your version is not idiomatic Ruby. –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 14 '12 at 1:20
    
@JörgWMittag: Although they are the same, I would never use raise WrongNumberOfPlayers in any code. Although it works, of I were just looking over some code, I would assume that the class object was being raised. –  Linuxios Mar 14 '12 at 1:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you sure your t is correct? Seems to me like it should be something like this:

t = [
      [["Armando", "P"],["Dave", "S"]],
      [["Richard", "R"],["Michael", "S"]],
      [["Allen", "S"],["Omer", "P"]],
      [["David E.", "R"], ["Richard X.", "P"]]
    ]

I assume Armando plays Dave in the first game. Richard plays Michael etc.

In your code [["Armando", "P"],["Dave", "S"]] plays [["Allen", "S"],["Omer", "P"]]. So when your rps_game_winner checks for game[0][1] it actually returns ["Dave", "S"]. Not P.

edit1: if you want to do the set-logic you speak of you need to modify rps_tournament_winner like so:

def rps_tournament_winner(t)
   t.each do |pair|
    pair.each do |g|
      puts 'winner:', yield(g)
    end
   end  
end

edit2: made my own implementation. take from it what you will. but it does what you want it to do. https://github.com/SpoBo/rock-paper-scissors

you basicaly need to keep track of the winners and let the winners play against themselves. my implementation allows for any number of players to play against each other. the only problem my implementation has is that a player always plays the same hand and as soon as 2 players with the same hands meet the game will become unpredictable. so it needs some modifications to handle this.

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Yes, the t is correct..here is why. There are two rounds. So Armando plays Dave, and Dave wins. Then Richard plays Michael and Richard wins. Then Dave (winner from first set) plays Richard (winner from second set). That winner is now the winner of Round 1, and then has to go on to play the winner of Round 2 to determine the tournament winner. So yes, it's a bit confusing...but the t is correct. –  marcamillion Mar 13 '12 at 22:23
    
what do the codes P R and S mean? –  dbenhur Mar 14 '12 at 3:35
    
Paper, Rock, Scissors :) –  marcamillion Mar 14 '12 at 7:05
    
winner: Dave S winner: Richard R winner: Allen S winner: Richard X. P –  SpoBo Mar 14 '12 at 11:56
    
That's the result I get when modifying the t my way. I don't see any 'set-logic' in your code. Your code just expects a game to exist of 2 arrays. each array containing a name and a 'hand'. –  SpoBo Mar 14 '12 at 12:01

You don't appear to be indexing deeply enough when you do your tests.

Input to rps_game_winner looks like [[["Armando", "P"], ["Dave", "S"]], [["Richard", "R"], ["Michael", "S"]]]. game[0][1] looks like ["Dave", "S"]. Your regex matches look like they're trying to test the letter which is the second entry of these tuples. Change all your game[x][y] to game[x][y].last and it might do what you want (I'll admit I have a hard time understanding the logic you're trying to express). You might to try making small objects (perhaps using Struct) representing your data more naturally rather than using deeply nested primitive data structures; this would make your code more comprehensible by giving sensible names and structure to the entries in this data structure.

BTW there's no need for the [char] classes in your regex, in fact no need for regex at all. game[0][1].last.upcase == 'R' instead of game[0][1].last =~ /[r]/i is faster and clearer.

share|improve this answer
    
Using .last doesn't work for me. When I test it with just one group - [["Richard", "R"], ["Michael", "S"]], I get this error: NoMethodError: undefined method 'last' for "R":String when trying it on one set - which should work. –  marcamillion Mar 13 '12 at 22:42

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