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In Python 2.7, I have a list containing strings of numbers 1-25 (for example). When printing them, I want the list to print on 5 lines, with 5 numbers per line.

Ideally:

>>> print(myList)
['1', '2', '3', '4', '5'
 '6', '7', '8', '9', '10',
 ...
 ...
 '21', '22', '23', '24', '25']

I know if I have to I can simply make five separate lists within myList and call

print(myList[0])
print(myList[1])
...

but I would really like to avoid that.

Thanks in advance!

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1  
Look at the pprint module –  Daenyth Mar 13 '12 at 21:37

6 Answers 6

You will have to roll your own representation function, like

def wrap_list(lst, items_per_line=5):
    lines = []
    for i in range(0, len(lst), items_per_line):
        chunk = lst[i:i + items_per_line]
        line = ", ".join("{!r}".format(x) for x in chunk)
        lines.append(line)
    return "[" + ",\n ".join(lines) + "]"

Example usage:

>>> print wrap_list(map(str, range(25)))
['0', '1', '2', '3', '4',
 '5', '6', '7', '8', '9',
 '10', '11', '12', '13', '14',
 '15', '16', '17', '18', '19',
 '20', '21', '22', '23', '24']
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Beat me to it by 8 seconds... mumble grumble –  Elliot Bonneville Mar 13 '12 at 21:42

Here's a no-frills solution that uses a for-loop:

for n, val in enumerate(myList, 1):
    print val,
    if n % 5 == 0:
        print "\n"
if n % 5:
    print "\n" # end the last line, if any

The enumeration starts at 1 to avoid a stray newline at the start.

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This does not print the leading [ nor trailing ], nor does it indent the all of the lines except the first. But nice use of enumerate with starting value –  Anthon Mar 13 '13 at 4:08
    
Adding the brackets and indent is kind of trivial, isn't it? I just demonstrated the line-wrapping. –  alexis Mar 13 '13 at 22:48

I don't think there is any ready-to-use function for this purpose, you probably still need to split the original list, or write your own print function. There is a simple solution by splitting the original list:

import pprint
pprint.pprint([l[i:i+5] for i in xrange(0, len(l), 5)])

However, it only works with the lists whose length are times by 5 (or any other integer you specify in your own version), it can not handle arbitrary-length lists. You will probably need your own print function for that case.

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I saw this and wanted to write one ugly one-liner, so here it is:

>>> l = range(25)
>>> w = 5
>>> print '\n'.join([str(x) for x in [l[i:i + w] for i in range(0, 25, w)]])
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
[5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[10, 11, 12, 13, 14]
[15, 16, 17, 18, 19]
[20, 21, 22, 23, 24]

Take it just as an idea

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The Python standard library provides textwrap, which you can use as:

from textwrap import fill
myList = [str(x) for x in range(25) ]
print(fill(str(myList), width=20) )
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Good idea to look into the stdlib, but this doesn't really do what the OP is trying to do - outputting five items of the list per row. –  Tim Pietzcker Aug 10 '13 at 9:02

Here's one of you:

for i in range(len(myList)):
    if i != 0 and i % (len(myList)/numOfLines) == 0: 
        print '\n'
    print myList[i],
share|improve this answer
    
This does not print the leading [ nor trailing ], nor does it indent the all of the lines except the first. –  Anthon Mar 13 '13 at 4:08

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