Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following code Ruby code will iterate the source string and produce a list of the cumulative words delimited by a '.' character, other than those after the last '.'.

For example, give a source string of 'Company.Dept.Group.Team' the result will be ... ["Company.Dept.Group", "Company.Dept", "Company"]

Given that a while loop in Python (I believe) will test only an expression and not a statement as shown below, how would one best write this in idiomatic Python?

#ruby
source = 'Company.Dept.Group.Team'
results = []

temp = source.clone
while (i = temp.rindex('.'))  # test statement not supported in Python?
  temp = temp[0...i]
  results << temp
end

p results   # >> ["Company.Dept.Group", "Company.Dept", "Company"]
share|improve this question
    
Yes, as far as I know, Python does not allow assigments in if conditions... which could be such handy thing sometimes. –  moooeeeep Mar 13 '12 at 22:12
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The Python idiom is something like this:

while True:
    i = temp.rindex('.')
    if not i:
        break
    ...
share|improve this answer
2  
rindex raises a ValueError, though, so this won't work as written. –  DSM Mar 13 '12 at 21:41
    
Also, if not i would be wrong anyway because 0 is a valid position in the string. rfind() would return -1 if it couldn't find the string. –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 13 '12 at 21:52
    
I marked this as the answer, because you were first to mention using 'while True:' as the Python idiomatic equivalent of a Ruby while loop that tests a statement. I think the exact code I might use is rfind() instead of rindex(), and then test for -1 to break on. Many thanks! –  Aryeh Mar 13 '12 at 23:18
add comment

I would do

>>> import re
>>> source = 'Company.Dept.Group.Team'
>>> results = [source[:m.start()] for m in re.finditer(r"\.", source)]
>>> results
['Company', 'Company.Dept', 'Company.Dept.Group']

(use reversed(results) if you want the order to be reversed).

A more or less literal translation of your code into Python would be

source = 'Company.Dept.Group.Team'
results = []
temp = source

while True:
    try:
        i = temp.rindex('.')
        temp = temp[:i]    
        results.append(temp)
    except ValueError:
        break
print(results)
share|improve this answer
add comment
>>> source = 'Company.Dept.Group.Team'
>>> last = []
>>> [last.append(s) or '.'.join(last) for s in source.split('.')[:-1]]
['Company', 'Company.Dept', 'Company.Dept.Group']
share|improve this answer
1  
A list comprehension with side effects? Usually, this isn't excatly considered "idiomatic Python". –  Sven Marnach Mar 13 '12 at 22:14
add comment

If you get used to Python you see list comprehensions and iterators/generators everywhere!

Python could be

source = 'Company.Dept.Group.Team'

# generate substrings
temp = source.split(".")
results = [".".join(temp[:i+1]) for i,s in enumerate(temp)]

# pop the team (alternatively slice the team out above)
results.pop()

# reverse results
result.reverse()

print result # should yield ["Company.Dept.Group", "Company.Dept", "Company"]

but most probably there are more idiomatic solutions ...

share|improve this answer
add comment

To accomplish this in general, I'd probably do:

source = 'Company.Dept.Group.Team'
split_source = source.split('.')
results = ['.'.join(split_source[0:x]) for x in xrange(len(split_source) - 1, 0, -1)]
print results

A literal translation would be more like:

source = 'Company.Dept.Group.Team'

temp = source
results = []
while True:
    i = temp.rfind('.')
    if i < 0:
        break
    temp = temp[0:i]
    results.append(temp)

print results

Or, if you prefer:

source = 'Company.Dept.Group.Team'

temp = source
results = []
try:
    while True:
        temp = temp[0:temp.rindex('.')]
        results.append(temp)
except ValueError:
    pass
print results

Or:

source = 'Company.Dept.Group.Team'

temp = source
results = []
i = temp.rfind('.')
while i > 0:
    temp = temp[0:i]
    results.append(temp)
    i = temp.rfind('.')

print results

As you point out, the fact that you cannot treat assignment as an expression makes these cases a bit inelegant. I think the former cases(s) - i.e. "while True" - are more common than the last one.

For more background, this post looks pretty good: http://effbot.org/pyfaq/why-can-t-i-use-an-assignment-in-an-expression.htm

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks, especially for that excellent pyfaq link. –  Aryeh Mar 13 '12 at 23:20
    
@Alex: "Many thanks" are usually expressed in upvotes :) –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 14 '12 at 14:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.