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I am trying to implement the Maybe monad from Haskell using the lambda functions in C++11 and templates. Here's what I have so far

#include<functional>
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

template<typename T1>
struct Maybe
{
  T1 data;
  bool valid;
};

template<typename T1, typename T2>
Maybe<T2> operator>>=(Maybe<T1> t, std::function < Maybe<T2> (T1)> &f)
{
  Maybe<T2> return_value;
  if(t.valid == false)
  {        
    return_value.valid = false;
    return return_value;
  }
  else
  {        
    return f(t.data);
  }            
}


int main()
{
  Maybe<int> x = {5, true};
  Maybe<int> y = {29, false};

  auto z = [](int a) -> Maybe<int>
    {
      Maybe<int> s;
      s.data = a+1;
      s.valid = true;
      return s;
    };

  Maybe<int> p = (x >>= z);
  Maybe<int> q = (y >>= z);

  cout<<p.data<<' '<<p.valid<<endl;        
  cout<<q.data<<' '<<q.valid<<endl;
}    

When it comes to the actual >>= call, I am getting a compiler error saying that no match found for >>= operator. Is my understanding of C++11's lambda functions failing me here?

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11  
Do you know Boost.Optional? That is C++'s Maybe monad. –  Xeo Mar 13 '12 at 21:45
4  
@rpg: C++ isn't very monad-friendly. –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 13 '12 at 21:49
6  
Note that >>= has nothing to do with monads. It's an operator used in Haskell to express the bind operation for monads, but that's just a decision made by the Haskell language designers. It's not an intrinsic part of a monad that this particular operator is used. So there's really little point in trying to implement monads in C++ with Haskell's syntax. Implement monads in C++ in a C++-friendly way, rather than blindly copying the completely arbitrary design decisions made in Haskell –  jalf Mar 13 '12 at 22:03
3  
Well, sure, do it for science. But keep in mind that without a do-notation substitute, the way this works out in practice is... not very practical. At least please reconsider the use of >>=: m >>= f >>= g in C++ is m >>= (f >>= g), but in Haskell it's (m >>= f) >>= g. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 13 '12 at 22:04
1  
>>= is pronounced as bind, so that's what I suggest you to use. Also, because return is a C++ keyword, you can borrow the name unit from category theory. –  Vitus Mar 13 '12 at 22:15
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The type of a lambda isn't a specialization of std::function. It's some unamed type. There is a conversion to std::function, but that means type deduction won't work for it. So, in this call:

Maybe<int> p = (x >>= z);

The type T2 can't be deduced:

Maybe<T2> operator>>=(Maybe<T1> t, std::function < Maybe<T2> (T1)> &f)

Store the lambda in a std::function variable from the start, and it should work:

std::function < Maybe<int> (int)> z = [](int a) -> Maybe<int> { ... };

However, it's probably easier to accept any kind of function object. That way you can still use auto for the lambda.

template<typename T1, typename F>
typename std::result_of<F(T1)>::type
operator>>=(Maybe<T1> t, F&& f) {
    ... std::forward<F>(f)(t.data);
}
share|improve this answer
    
If types for T2 can't be deduced, does that mean that this approach is doomed? Is there another way to hack it without using Boost. I would like to see all the code in one place so that I can understand it better, which is why I don't want to use Boost. –  rpg Mar 13 '12 at 22:00
    
@rpg I edited some alternatives in. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 13 '12 at 22:02
    
Thanks a lot. That worked. But removing auto made the code a lot more verbose. Which kind of makes this impractical to use. :P –  rpg Mar 13 '12 at 22:05
    
The last option works with auto, because it doesn't require a conversion: it deduces F to whatever the unnamed type of the lambda is (plus the appropriate kind of reference). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 13 '12 at 22:13
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The following works for me: I use decltype to infer the type returned by the lambda:

template<typename T1, typename Func>    
auto operator>>=(Maybe<T1> t, Func f) -> decltype(f(t.data))
{    
  decltype(f(t.data)) return_value;    
  if(t.valid == false)    
  {            
    return_value.valid = false;    
    return return_value;    
  }    
  else    
  {            
    return f(t.data);    
  }                
}

EDIT

For type safety :

template<typename T1>    
struct Maybe    
{    
  T1 data;    
  bool valid;

  static const bool isMaybe = true;
};

template<typename T1, typename Func>     
auto operator>>=(Maybe<T1> t, Func f) -> decltype(f(t.data)) 
{
  typedef decltype(f(t.data)) RT;
  static_assert(RT::isMaybe, "F doesn't return a maybe");
  ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This works too. But as far as I can tell, it loses a bit of type safety. I guess I shouldn't care much about this though, considering it is C++. –  rpg Mar 13 '12 at 22:11
    
Not much type safety is lost and you gain in flexibility. That way you can't pass functions that don't take the wrong arguments they may just return results which are not "Maybe" which means you can convert a Maybe to a normal type if you wish to do so. –  J.N. Mar 13 '12 at 22:22
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Here's my maybe "monad" that I use quite often in my C++ projects (disclaimer: see the comments below). It's insofar more like the Haskell Maybe than your implementation as it only holds an object in the just case (points mobj on it), not wasting space if it's nothing. This also allows it to use of C++11 move semantics, to avoid unnecessary copies. The return types of fmap (fmapped member function) and >>= are deduced with decltype.

template<typename DataT>
class maybe;
template<typename DataT>
maybe<DataT> just(const DataT &obj);
struct nothing_object{nothing_object(){}};
const nothing_object nothing;

                 //template class objects of which may or may not contain some given
                // data object. Inspired by Haskell's Maybe monad.
template<typename DataT>
class maybe {
  DataT *obj;

 public:

  class iterator {
    DataT *mobj;
    explicit iterator(DataT *init):mobj(init){}
   public:
    iterator():mobj(nullptr){}
    iterator(const iterator &cp):mobj(cp.mobj){}
    bool operator!=(const iterator &other)const{return mobj!=other.mobj;}
    DataT &operator*() const{return *mobj;}
    iterator &operator++(){ mobj=nullptr; return *this; }
    friend class maybe;
  };
  class const_iterator {
    const DataT *mobj;
    explicit const_iterator(const DataT *init):mobj(init){}
   public:
    const_iterator():mobj(nullptr){}
    const_iterator(const const_iterator &cp):mobj(cp.mobj){}
    bool operator!=(const const_iterator &other)const{return mobj!=other.mobj;}
    const DataT &operator*() const{return *mobj;}
    const_iterator &operator++(){ mobj=nullptr; return *this; }
    friend class maybe;
  };
  iterator begin(){return iterator(obj);}
  iterator end(){return iterator();}
  const_iterator begin()const{return const_iterator(obj);}
  const_iterator end()const{return const_iterator();}
  const_iterator c_begin()const{return const_iterator(obj);}
  const_iterator c_end()const{return const_iterator();}

  bool is_nothing()const{return obj==nullptr;}
  void make_nothing(){delete obj; obj=nullptr;}
  bool is_just()const{return obj!=nullptr;}
  template<typename CpDataT>
  void with_just_assign(CpDataT &mdftg)const{if(obj) mdftg=*obj;}
  DataT &from_just(){return *obj;}
  DataT &operator*(){return *obj;}
  const DataT &from_just()const{return *obj;}
  const DataT &operator*()const{return *obj;}

  template<typename CmpDataT>
  bool operator==(const maybe<CmpDataT> &cmp)const{
    return is_just()==cmp.is_just() && (is_nothing() || *obj==*cmp.obj); }
  template<typename CmpDataT>
  bool operator!=(const maybe<CmpDataT> &cmp)const{
    return is_just()!=cmp.is_just() || (is_just() && *obj!=*cmp.obj); }
  bool operator==(const nothing_object &n)const{return obj==nullptr;}
  bool operator!=(const nothing_object &n)const{return obj!=nullptr;}

  template<typename MpFnT>
  auto fmapped(MpFnT f) const -> maybe<decltype(f(*obj))> {
    return obj? just(f(*obj)) : nothing;                  }
  template<typename MonadicFn>
  auto operator>>=(MonadicFn f) const -> decltype(f(*obj)) {
    return obj? f(*obj) : nothing;                         }
  template<typename ReplaceDT>
  auto operator>>(const maybe<ReplaceDT> &r) const -> maybe<ReplaceDT> {
    return obj? r : nothing;                                           }
  auto operator>>(const nothing_object &n) const -> maybe<DataT> {
    return nothing;                                              }


  maybe(const nothing_object &n):obj(nullptr){}
  template<typename CpDataT>
  explicit maybe(const CpDataT &cobj):obj(new DataT(cobj)){}
  template<typename CpDataT>
  maybe &operator=(const CpDataT &cobj){delete obj; obj=new DataT(cobj); return *this;}
  template<typename CpDataT>
  maybe(const maybe<CpDataT> &cp):obj(cp.is_just()?new DataT(cp.from_just()):nullptr){}
  template<typename CpDataT>
  maybe &operator=(const maybe<CpDataT> &cp){
    delete obj;  obj = cp.is_just()? new DataT(cp.from_just()) : nullptr; return *this;}
  maybe(maybe<DataT> &&mv):obj(mv.obj){mv.obj=nullptr;}
  maybe &operator=(maybe<DataT> &&mv) {
    delete obj; obj=mv.obj; mv.obj=nullptr; return *this; }

  ~maybe(){delete obj;}
};

template<typename DataT>
auto just(const DataT &obj) -> maybe<DataT> {return maybe<DataT>(obj);}

template<typename MpFnT, typename DataT>              // represents Haskell's <$> infix
auto operator^(MpFnT f, const maybe<DataT> &m) -> decltype(m.fmapped(f)) {
  return m.fmapped(f);
}

template<typename DataT>
auto joined(const maybe<maybe<DataT>> &m) -> maybe<DataT> {
  return m.is_just()? m.from_just() : nothing;
}


template<typename DataT>
auto maybe_yes(const std::pair<DataT,bool>& mbcst) -> maybe<DataT> {
  return mbcst.second ? just(mbcst.first) : nothing;
}
template<typename DataT>
auto maybe_not(const std::pair<DataT,bool>& mbcst) -> maybe<DataT> {
  return !mbcst.second ? just(mbcst.first) : nothing;
}

The somewhat strange-seeming begin and end iterators allow it to be used in C++11 range-based for loops:

maybe<int> a = just(7), b = nothing;

for (auto&i: a) std::cout << i;
for (auto&i: b) std::cout << i;

outputs only once 7.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the interesting code, but it could be presented a bit better. –  J.N. Mar 13 '12 at 23:34
2  
You didn't note that not trading space comes at the (not neglectable) expense of dynamic memory allocation. Any reason not to use unique_ptr ? –  J.N. Mar 13 '12 at 23:37
    
@J.N. indeed, dynamic memory allocation is much more expensive than stack, so it's a bad idea to use it for many small objects. I don't claim it's the optimal implementation, I just had the idea to implement it (for a class that had rather a lot of data members, so there it was good to allocate on heap) when I started learning about the C++0x features and wanted to learn about implementing move semantics. And I first wanted to know how it works with plain pointers, now I'd use unique_ptr, arguably better choice here. –  leftaroundabout Mar 14 '12 at 1:04
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Noticed that std::function have an empty state, we can have the following implementation

template<typename T>
class Maybe{
private:
    Maybe(T t){
        get = [t](){ return t; };
    }
    Maybe(){}
    std::function<T ()> get;
public:
    typedef T content_type;

    template<typename WhenJust, typename WhenNothing>
    auto on(WhenJust &&whenJust, WhenNothing &&whenNothing) 
        -> decltype(whenNothing()){
        if(get==nullptr) return whenNothing();
        else return whenJust(get());
    }
    template<typename U>
    friend Maybe<U> just(U u);
    template<typename U>
    friend Maybe<U> nothing();
};

template<typename T>
Maybe<T> just(T t){
    return Maybe<T>(t);
}

template<typename T>
Maybe<T> nothing(){
    return Maybe<T>();
}

template<typename T, typename BinderFunction>
auto operator >>(Maybe<T> m, BinderFunction bind) 
    -> Maybe<typename decltype(bind(*((T*)nullptr)))::content_type> {
    return m.on([bind](T v){
        return bind(v);
    },[](){
        return nothing<typename decltype(bind(*((T*)nullptr)))::content_type>();
    });
}

In this implementation, all factory methods are free (friend) functions, the >> operator (not to be confused with >> in Haskell, this is the equivalent of >>= with same associative) is also free, and even not a friend function. Also notice the on member function, this is used to force any client intended to use a Maybe instance must be prepared for both cases (Just or Nothing).

Here is an example of usage:

int main()
{
    auto n = just(10) >> [](int j){ std::cout<<j<<" >> "; return just(j+10.5); }
        >> [](double d){ std::cout<<d<<" >> "; return nothing<char>(); }
        >> [](char c){ std::cout<<c; return just(10); }
        ;

    n.on(
        [](int i) { std::cout<<i; },
        []() { std::cout<<"nothing!"; });

    std::cout << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

The output is

10 >> 20.5 >> nothing!
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