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I am wondering why the call of

z.f(-6);

in class M refers to the following function in class B:

public void f(double y) {
    this.x = (int) y + B.y;
}

instead of using function f in class A, since b.x is covered by A. Or rather uses

public void f (int y) {
    this.x = y*2;
    B.y = this.x;
}

in class B where at least the parameter type matches.

Complete Code below:

public class A {
    public int x = 1;
    public A(int x) {
        this.x += x;
    }
     public A (double x) {
        x += x;
    }
    public void f(double x) {
        this.x = this.x + (int) (x + B.y);
    }
}

public class B extends A {
    public static int y = 3;
    public int x = 0;
    public B (double x) {
        super((int) x);
    }
    public void f(int y) {
        this.x = y*2;
        B.y = this.x;
    }
    public void f(double y) {
        this.x = (int) y + B.y;
    }
  }

public class M {
      public static void main (String[] args){
        A a = new A(B.y);
        a.f(1);
        B b = new B(3.0);
        A z = b;
        z.f(-5.0);
        z.f(-6);
        System.out.println(b.x + "   " + z.x);
       }
  }
share|improve this question
    
I think Mike Samuel's answer covered it pretty well, since z has type A, even though it holds an instance of A's subclass B, only methods of A can and will be invoked; for invocations of methods of subtype B, you would have to downcast z (always use checked downcasts though, for example using instanceof, because you might get runtime exceptions otherwise). - On an unrelated note, since I saw your profile on Theoretical Computer Science and am considering doing my master's at RWTH, how's studying there? Sounds somewhat demanding judging from your question on TCS? –  G. Bach Mar 13 '12 at 23:51
    
EDIT: I misread Mike Samuel's answer, in his first sentence it needs to read "A.f(double)". A correct and less detailed answer (that's also less demanding while still capturing the question) would be Miserable Variable's; also check the comments on that one. –  G. Bach Mar 14 '12 at 0:33
    
@ G. Bach: I can highly recommend RWTH University. It's challenging, but fun. I am only in my first semester, so my experiences are quite limited ;-) –  Laura Mar 15 '12 at 18:46
    
Thanks for your feedback :) Just out of curiosity, your question about Eppstein's Algorithm (on TSC) was somewhat extracurricular I expect? I'm nearly done with my bachelor's and haven't had to look at anything besides course material (certainly not published articles) until now for doing my bachelor's thesis. Was that paper part of your coursework or was it more of a "I'd like to know that in more detail, lemme look that one up" thing? –  G. Bach Mar 15 '12 at 19:01
    
@G.Bach: That was part of a proseminar on "Algorithms and Datastructures". Where are you studying? Maybe we should switch to email? –  Laura Mar 18 '12 at 12:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
z.f(-6);

Static type of z is A, which has only one method named f. That method takes double parameter, to which the literal value -6 can be promoted. So at compile time the call is bound to A.f(double).

At runtime z is found to be of type B, which overrides A.f(double) with its own B.f(double), and so that this the method that gets called.

share|improve this answer
    
I was under the impression that the call only binds to the subclass-method if the variable is cast to the subclass - a simple test however showed that you are right on this, even though at compile-time the call binds to A.f(double), at runtime it binds to B.f(double) since z is an instance of type B. –  G. Bach Mar 14 '12 at 0:06
    
@G.Bach yes, that is the whole point of overriding, to determine the method to call depending on the dynamic type. –  Miserable Variable Mar 14 '12 at 0:10
    
Do I understand this correctly then, that which method of an overloaded method name is bound to is decided at compile time, while the question of which class's overriding of that (then already selected) method is decided at runtime? What I tried was: if one adds a method A.f(int), the call z.(-6) will end up in B.f(int), so what to me seems to happen for that call is that at compile-time, the compiler chooses A.f(int) since z is in a variable of type A, while at runtime this is overwritten by B.f(int). I was not aware of that. –  G. Bach Mar 14 '12 at 0:24
    
@G.Bach you got it –  Miserable Variable Mar 14 '12 at 0:25

The static type of z is A so z.f(-6) can only bind to a method in A, which in this case is A.f(int).

The language is designed this way so that

A z = new B(3.0);
z.f(-6);

will always behave the same as

A z = complicatedWayToComputeTrue() ? new B(3.0) : new A(3.0);
z.f(-6);

If the compiler were to bind to a different method signature because it can prove that A z always holds a B then this would introduce all kinds of non-local effects to the language making it really hard to debug or maintain java programs.

Imagine someone trying to maintain

final A z = complicatedWayToComputeTrue() ? new B(3.0) : new A(3.0);
// 1000 lines elided
z.f(-6);

by changing it to

A z = new B(3.0);
// 1000 lines elided
z.f(-6);

If the compiler can now prove that A is always a B and binds Z.f to a method in B, the maintainer will be baffled.

share|improve this answer
    
The first sentence (and the main thrust) of this answer is completely incorrect. Of course you can invoke a method on a subclass when its type is referred to by the superclass - that's the essence of OOP! –  Bohemian Mar 13 '12 at 23:31
    
@Bohemian, Try this program. class A {} class B extends A { void f() {} public static void main(String[] args) { A x = new B(); A.foo(); } }. You will get a compile error: "Cannot find symbol method foo()". –  Mike Samuel Mar 13 '12 at 23:34
    
You are both right, depending on the situation. If you override a method in the subclass, then clearly it will be bound to even when referring to instances of the parent class, if you overload or create a new method, not so much. –  increment1 Mar 13 '12 at 23:38
    
@increment1, Would you agree with this following phrasing? At compile time, Java chooses the signature of an overloaded method based on the static types of the receiver and arguments, but among overridden methods with the same signature, all dispatch in java is virtual hence the runtime concrete type is used –  Mike Samuel Mar 13 '12 at 23:42
    
@increment1, Would you also agree that the answer to this question hinges on a choice between different overloadings, not different overridings? –  Mike Samuel Mar 13 '12 at 23:43

Java is single dispatch, whereas what you are attempting to do is double dispatch (where the method invoked depends on both the dynamic runtime class and parameters).

The signature of a method to invoke in Java is determined at compile time; this means that the declared class of the object determines which method is bound to. Overriding a method in a subclass affects the bound implementation, but overloading a method does not (since the overloaded method has a different signature).

In class B you are overloading f() with a version that takes an int, when using an object declared as being of class A, this method does not appear to exist (you cannot call it, and it will not be invoked).

To summarize:

  • The compiler binds to a method signature at compile time.
  • This bound signature depends on the declared (compile time) type of the object and parameters.
  • If a method is overridden in a subclass, then when invoking on the subclass (regardless of the declared type), the overridden method will be chosen.
  • Overloading is not overriding, to override you need the same method signature (well, excepting covariance).
share|improve this answer

Well I might be wrong, but if you link the object z of type A to an object of type B, it will still bind as type B, that's why it's executing the method in class B and not in class A. Note that you are NOT creating an object of type Asince you're not using new.

And as Mike Samuel said, by default -6 should be considered an int, but that doesn't fit with your explanation. I'll try to find out a proper answer for this.

share|improve this answer
    
Not "by default." In Java, -6 is always an int literal. Java does not have arbitrary precision constants like Go where "Numeric constants represent values of arbitrary precision and do not overflow." –  Mike Samuel Mar 13 '12 at 23:46

Because in java a literal number is by default an int.

If you want to invoke the double version, use a literal double:

z.f(-6D);
share|improve this answer
1  
This won't even compile, will it? –  Neil Mar 13 '12 at 23:32
    
But OP says it goes B.f(double) –  Miserable Variable Mar 13 '12 at 23:34
    
The question is asking why it binds to f(double). It doesn't bind to f(int). –  Mike Samuel Mar 13 '12 at 23:36
    
@Neil, no it won't compile. See my example program in my comment in response to Bohemian under my answer. –  Mike Samuel Mar 13 '12 at 23:36
    
@Mike but it (z.f(-6D)) does compile. Guess why :) –  Miserable Variable Mar 14 '12 at 0:13

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