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i'm quite new to php and trying to learn. I have 2 similiar classes. I want to create that objects when i pass count and object type. I read some about factory pattern. Here is my factory class:

    class AssetFactory
    {
        private static $table;
        public static $objects = array();
        public static function Create($asset,$count)
        {

            switch ($asset) {
            case "Item":
                self::$table = "items";
                break;
            case "Job":
                self::$table = "jobs";
                break;
            }
                $db = new Database();
                $rows = $db->query("SELECT * FROM ".self::$table." LIMIT ".$count);

                foreach($rows as $row)
                {
                    self::$objects[] =  new $asset($row);
                }

            return self::$objects;
         }
    }

and when i need 5 items i use:

  $myItems = AssetFactory::Create('Item',5);

when i need some jobs i use:

  $myJobs= AssetFactory::Create('Job',5);

item and job are that similiar classes. My question is here, as i said im trying to learn. Am i doing this right? Did i understand factory pattern right? Have any good documents about this(i read everything on php.net, got anything else).

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are few thing that seem wrong in this case.

First of all , there are two similar structures which are used for object creation:

  • factories: if object requires some sort of initialization before released for 'consumption'
  • builders: if before creating object you have to create bunch of other objects

Usually people do not distinguish between the two, and just call them "Factories". So these would be two case where you use a factory.

What you have right now does not fit the description. You are creating some sort of database connection, then getting some data, and then using it for creating a list of objects. This is not a reusable code.

It would be much better if the usage of factory would be something like this :

$connection = new PDO( .. blah.. );
$stmt = $connection->query( 'SELECT * FROM '.$type.' LIMIT '.$count );
$factory = new Factory;
$collection = $factory->buildCollection( $type, $stmt->fetchALL(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC) );

Of course, with factory class which implements this behavior.

Additionally , you might want to watch (assuming, that you haven't seen already) two videos on the subject:

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I am far from an authority on the factory design pattern, but I usually delegate the instantiation to a subclass.

<?php
class AssetFactory
{
    public static function Create($asset, $count)
    {
        $objects = false;

        switch ( strtolower($asset) ) {
            case 'item':
            case 'job':
                $class_name = 'Asset'.$asset;
                $asset_obj  = $class_name::getInstance();
                $objects    = $asset_obj->Create($count);
                break;

            default:
                // Invalid asset
                break;
        }

        return $objects;
    }
}

class Asset
{
    var $name                = null;
    var $table               = null;
    private static $instance = null;

    private function __construct() {}

    private function __clone() {}

    public function Create($count)
    {
        $objects = array();

        $db   = new Database();
        $rows = $db->query("SELECT * FROM ".$this->table." LIMIT ".$count);

        if ( is_array($rows) ) {
            foreach($rows as $row)
            {
                $objects[] = new Item($row);
            }
        }

        return $objects;
    }

    public static function getInstance()
    {
        if ( empty($self::$instance) ) {
            $class_name = __CLASS__;
            self::$instance = new $class_name();
        }

        return self::$instance;
    }
}

class AssetItem extends Asset
{
    private function __construct()
    {
        $this->name  = 'Item';
        $this->table = 'item';

        parent::__construct();
    }

}

class AssetJob extends Asset
{
    private function __construct()
    {
        $this->name  = 'Job';
        $this->table = 'job';

        parent::__construct();
    }

}
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The extend defines an "is a" relationship. You have to be careful not to write class User extends Table or something as schizophrenic as that. –  tereško Mar 13 '12 at 23:55
1  
After reading tereško's response above, I realized just how much I don't know about design patterns. Ignore my response, it isn't truly a Factory and there is no reason for the Asset class to be a singleton. –  augustknight Mar 15 '12 at 15:44
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