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This is the first time I'm using the fft function and I'm trying to plot the frequency spectrum of a simple cosine function:

f = cos(2*pi*300*t)

The sampling rate is 220500. I'm plotting one second of the function f.

Here is my attempt:

time = 1;
freq = 220500;
t = 0 : 1/freq : 1 - 1/freq;
N = length(t);
df = freq/(N*time);

F = fftshift(fft(cos(2*pi*300*t))/N);
faxis = -N/2 / time : df : (N/2-1) / time;

plot(faxis, real(F));
grid on;
xlim([-500, 500]);

Why do I get odd results when I increase the frequency to 900Hz? These odd results can be fixed by increasing the x-axis limits from, say, 500Hz to 1000Hz. Also, is this the correct approach? I noticed many other people didn't use fftshift(X) (but I think they only did a single sided spectrum analysis).

Thank you.

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What are the values of N and t? Also, you cannot plot "one second" of a frequency domain function either. Give me N and t and I can help. –  learnvst Mar 14 '12 at 1:23
    
Okay, added them I think my main issue is, I don't understand what the domain of the is. I also don't get why df doesn't equal freq/N. –  Jean-Luc Mar 14 '12 at 2:05
    
Ok, the fft function switches the signal from the frequeny and time domains. Your frequency axis should only depend on the sampling rate and the number of points in the FFT. I am on a mobile device at the moment and it is the middle of the night here but I will post a proper solution in a few hours when I am by a computer. –  learnvst Mar 14 '12 at 2:17
    
Okay, thank you. –  Jean-Luc Mar 14 '12 at 2:19
    
n/time is exactly the sampling frequency, the frequency axis is perfectly right –  Castilho Mar 14 '12 at 3:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is my response as promised.

The first or your questions related to why you "get odd results when you increase the frequency to 900 Hz" is related to the Matlab's plot rescaling functionality as described by @Castilho. When you change the range of the x-axis, Matlab will try to be helpful and rescale the y-axis. If the peaks lie outside of your specified range, matlab will zoom in on the small numerical errors generated in the process. You can remedy this with the 'ylim' command if it bothers you.

However, your second, more open question "is this the correct approach?" requires a deeper discussion. Allow me to tell you how I would go about making a more flexible solution to achieve your goal of plotting a cosine wave.

You begin with the following:

time = 1;
freq = 220500;

This raises an alarm in my head immediately. Looking at the rest of the post, you appear to be interested in frequencies in the sub-kHz range. If that is the case, then this sampling rate is excessive as the Nyquist limit (sr/2) for this rate is above 100 kHz. I'm guessing you meant to use the common audio sampling rate of 22050 Hz (but I could be wrong here)?

Either way, your analysis works out numerically OK in the end. However, you are not helping yourself to understand how the FFT can be used most effectively for analysis in real-world situations.

Allow me to post how I would do this. The following script does almost exactly what your script does, but opens some potential on which we can build . .

%// These are the user parameters
durT = 1;
fs = 22050;
NFFT = durT*fs;
sigFreq = 300;

%//Calculate time axis
dt = 1/fs;
tAxis = 0:dt:(durT-dt);

%//Calculate frequency axis
df = fs/NFFT;
fAxis = 0:df:(fs-df);

%//Calculate time domain signal and convert to frequency domain
x = cos(  2*pi*sigFreq*tAxis  );
F = abs(  fft(x, NFFT)  /  NFFT  );

subplot(2,1,1);
plot(  fAxis, 2*F  )
xlim([0 2*sigFreq])
title('single sided spectrum')

subplot(2,1,2);
plot(  fAxis-fs/2, fftshift(F)  )
xlim([-2*sigFreq 2*sigFreq])
title('whole fft-shifted spectrum')

You calculate a time axis and calculate your number of FFT points from the length of the time axis. This is very odd. The problem with this approach, is that the frequency resolution of the fft changes as you change the duration of your input signal, because N is dependent on your "time" variable. The matlab fft command will use an FFT size that matches the size of the input signal.

In my example, I calculate the frequency axis directly from the NFFT. This is somewhat irrelevant in the context of the above example, as I set the NFFT to equal the number of samples in the signal. However, using this format helps to demystify your thinking and it becomes very important in my next example.

** SIDE NOTE: You use real(F) in your example. Unless you have a very good reason to only be extracting the real part of the FFT result, then it is much more common to extract the magnitude of the FFT using abs(F). This is the equivalent of sqrt(real(F).^2 + imag(F).^2).**

Most of the time you will want to use a shorter NFFT. This might be because you are perhaps running the analysis in a real time system, or because you want to average the result of many FFTs together to get an idea of the average spectrum for a time varying signal, or because you want to compare spectra of signals that have different duration without wasting information. Just using the fft command with a value of NFFT < the number of elements in your signal will result in an fft calculated from the last NFFT points of the signal. This is a bit wasteful.

The following example is much more relevant to useful application. It shows how you would split a signal into blocks and then process each block and average the result:

%//These are the user parameters
durT = 1;
fs = 22050;
NFFT = 2048;
sigFreq = 300;

%//Calculate time axis
dt = 1/fs;
tAxis = dt:dt:(durT-dt);

%//Calculate frequency axis
df = fs/NFFT;
fAxis = 0:df:(fs-df);

%//Calculate time domain signal 
x = cos(  2*pi*sigFreq*tAxis  );

%//Buffer it and window
win = hamming(NFFT);%//chose window type based on your application
x = buffer(x, NFFT, NFFT/2); %// 50% overlap between frames in this instance
x = x(:, 2:end-1); %//optional step to remove zero padded frames
x = (  x' * diag(win)  )'; %//efficiently window each frame using matrix algebra

%// Calculate mean FFT
F = abs(  fft(x, NFFT)  /  sum(win)  );
F = mean(F,2);

subplot(2,1,1);
plot(  fAxis, 2*F  )
xlim([0 2*sigFreq])
title('single sided spectrum')

subplot(2,1,2);
plot(  fAxis-fs/2, fftshift(F)  )
xlim([-2*sigFreq 2*sigFreq])
title('whole fft-shifted spectrum')

I use a hamming window in the above example. The window that you choose should suit the application http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Window_function

The overlap amount that you choose will depend somewhat on the type of window you use. In the above example, the Hamming window weights the samples in each buffer towards zero away from the centre of each frame. In order to use all of the information in the input signal, it is important to use some overlap. However, if you just use a plain rectangular window, the overlap becomes pointless as all samples are weighted equally. The more overlap you use, the more processing is required to calculate the mean spectrum.

Hope this helps your understanding.

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Thank you for your reply; it certainly helps. Is there are reason why in your first codeblock, NFFT = fs and df = fs/NFFT = 1? –  Jean-Luc Mar 14 '12 at 10:30
    
I have changed it to NFFT = durT*fs which is the same thing in this example. The fact that df=1 is a kind of fluke and just related to the fact that you are using one second of signal. Try different durations of signal by changing durT and you will see that the resolution of your analysis is dependent on duration. Not necessarily a bad thing but I'm trying to help you understand why this happens. –  learnvst Mar 14 '12 at 10:35
    
By the way, you're right about the 22050Hz (220500 is a typo). Also, I looked up NFFT and found that it stood for "Nonequispaced fast Fourier transform". From what I can tell, in your code sample, NFFT = the number of samples. From what I can tell, the number of samples are all equispaced (dt = 1/22050). What's going on with the NFFT? Thanks again! –  Jean-Luc Mar 14 '12 at 11:41
1  
Nfft is just a variable name i use for the number of points in the fft. It is not an anacronym for anything. The frequncy resolution is dependent on the number of points in the fft. See the line: df=... –  learnvst Mar 16 '12 at 0:36

Your result is perfectly right. Your frequency axis calculation is also right. The problem lies on the y axis scale. When you use the function xlims, matlab automatically recalculates the y scale so that you can see "meaningful" data. When the cosine peaks lie outside the limit you chose (when f>500Hz), there are no peaks to show, so the scale is calculated based on some veeeery small noise (here at my computer, with matlab 2011a, the y scale was 10-16).

Changing the limit is indeed the correct approach, because if you don't change it you can't see the peaks on the frequency spectrum.

One thing I noticed, however. Is there a reason for you to plot the real part of the transform? Usually, it is abs(F) that gets plotted, and not the real part.

edit: Actually, you're frequency axis is only right because df, in this case, is 1. The faxis line is right, but the df calculation isn't.

The FFT calculates N points from -Fs/2 to Fs/2. So N points over a range of Fs yields a df of Fs/N. As N/time = Fs => time = N/Fs. Substituting that on the expression of df you used: your_df = Fs/N*(N/Fs) = (Fs/N)^2. As Fs/N = 1, the final result was right :P

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Thanks for your reply. I just wanted to plot the real part to see, no particular reason. What I dont get is, why df = freq/(Ntime) and not df = freq/time. I feel as though I've flukes the x-axis. Also, when you do an FFT, between what frequencies does it calculate? Does it calculate from -freq/2 to freq/2? Or -freqn/2 to freq*n/2? –  Jean-Luc Mar 14 '12 at 8:20
    
Actually you are right, df is wrong. You are calculating df^2, and as in this case df is 1, it is exactly the same. I'll edit the answer –  Castilho Mar 14 '12 at 9:50

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