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Is there any way to use an instance of vi/vim on a remote server to edit a local file?

Something along the lines of:

cat $local_file | ssh -t $remote_server "vim -" > $local_file

[I'm using the code above only to simplify and illustrate the intent of the question]

I know that I can go the other way and edit the file from the remote_server using vim + scp, but I was curious if it could be done in this direction as well.

share|improve this question
    
Some background: I have some legacy servers that we're not permitted to install or upgrade software on that are running very old versions of vi. It'd be nice to be able to have syntax highlighting/etc when working with those files. Currently I am using a script that combines scp, temporary files, etc.. to accomplish this - but I was curious if there was a better way – DismissedAsDrone Mar 14 '12 at 4:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use this kind of command :

ssh -t remote 'vim scp://root@oldy//etc/resolv.conf'

vim copy the file in local /tmp in a file like /tmp/v7MZ6yF/0 in the background.

share|improve this answer
    
I am trying to use a remote version of vim as the local version is very old and I am not allowed to add/modify software on that machine. – DismissedAsDrone Mar 14 '12 at 4:50
    
See my post edit – Gilles Quenot Mar 14 '12 at 4:54
    
That's perfect - thank you! – DismissedAsDrone Mar 19 '12 at 18:45
    
You're welcome ;) – Gilles Quenot Mar 19 '12 at 19:55
    
If anyone else needs a similar solution, I put together a quick shell script to automate the process: https://github.com/sonicradish/Shell-Scripts/blob/master/redit – DismissedAsDrone Mar 21 '12 at 22:00

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