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I have been doing some searching around Google and this site for some ways to go about constructing some models for an application I am working on.

I plan to have Users and Teams. A user can join a team and one team only. A team can obviously have many users. Also, I want to add a 'leader' role inside the team that is assigned to the User who creates a Team but can later be passed on to another User who is already a part of that team.

I have seen some examples of models for something like this and saw a few like this:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_one :team
    has_many :memberships
end

class Membership < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :user
    belongs_to :team
end

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many :memberships
    has_many :users, :through => :memberships
end

Why is the Membership model necessary? I have seen it in a few examples and I am not sure I quite follow the logic of why it is in there and what it is doing.

Also, if I did something like has_one :leader in the Team model and had the Leader model, would that be considered the best practice for determining a leader in a Team? It seems like a bit much to have an entire model/table for Leader.

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1 Answer 1

The Memberships model is allowing for a many-to-many relationship there. It's acting as the join table. It would allow Users to belong to many Teams and Teams to have many Users.

Sounds like you just want a one-to-many though?

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :team
end

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :users
end

I'll have to double check this part but you can use additional parameters to specify the models in your assocation if they don't match up with the name you need. So Team could have a leader that's just a User model.

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :users
  has_one :leader, :class_name => "User", :foreign_key => "user_id"
end

the rails guides page on associations has a good summary including the part about the :class_name and other options http://guides.rubyonrails.org/association_basics.html#the-has_many-association

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Thank you for the reply and clarification. Suppose I did want to allow a User to belong to many Teams and a Team to have many Users. Why would I need to have the Membership model to join them? Could I not do has_many :teams in the User model? –  user1076802 Mar 14 '12 at 18:47
    
To support a many to many relationship you need a junction / join table. Without that junction table you'd need a separate team_id column on User for every team a user belonged to. The junction table is letting you do a one to many from both the User and Team sides of the relationship. This wikipedia link is short but describes the basic idea en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Many-to-many_%28data_model%29 In Rails the other alternative is to do has_and_belongs_to_many from both sides, and then generate a join table that's just 2 cols team_id, user_id without an id column, this table isn't a model –  xkickflip Mar 14 '12 at 21:39
    
Ah, okay that makes sense. So, since I am wanting a User to only be able to belong to one team at a time, I should not use a junction table such as Memberships. Would I want to use :belongs_to in the User model or :has_one? It would seem that :has_one makes more sense but in your example you use :belongs_to. –  user1076802 Mar 15 '12 at 3:10
    
:belongs_to and :has_one both specify one-to-one relationships somewhat differently. :belongs_to is paired with both :has_one and :has_many, it is the side of the relationship whose model gets the foreign key. When doing a :has_many from Team, the User model has the :belongs_to and thus the foreign key column. Since User.team_id foreign key column can only hold one value (belongs_to one team) it's a one to one relationship from a User to a Team. Here's an old but very succinct blog post with a few examples blog.hasmanythrough.com/2007/1/15/… –  xkickflip Mar 15 '12 at 6:37

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