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I am new in move constructor, I surveyed from some sites and tried using the Visual Studio 11 Express Beta..

Below is my testing code...

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo()
      : Memory(nullptr)
    {
        cout<<"Foo Constructor"<<endl;
    }
    ~Foo()
    {
        cout<<"~Foo Destructor"<<endl;
        if(Memory != nullptr)
            delete []Memory;
    }
    Foo(Foo& rhs)
      : Memory(nullptr)
    {
        cout<<"Copy Constructor"<<endl;

        //allocate
        //this->Memory = new ....
        //copy 
        //memcpy(this->Memory, rhs.Memory...);
    }

    Foo& operator=(Foo& rhs)
    {
        cout<<"="<<endl;
    }
    void* Memory;

    Foo(int nBytes) { Memory = new char[nBytes]; }

    Foo(Foo&& rhs)
    {
        cout<<"Foo Move Constructor"<<endl;
        Memory = rhs.Memory;
        rhs.Memory = nullptr;
    }
};

Foo Get()
{
    Foo f;
    return f; 
    //return Foo();
}
void Set(Foo rhs)
{
    Foo obj(rhs);
}
int main()
{
    Set(Get());
    return 0;
}

I don't know why it will not enter move constructor.

It's really a Rvalue from Get();

If I modified non-const copy constructor from const constructor,

it will enter move constructor. Behavior changed...

Could anyone kindly explain why it happened?

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5  
delete [] void_ptr; is undefined behaviour. Note that delete nullptr is perfectly fine, no need to check beforehand. Also, no need for all the useless boilerplate code. Cut that, and paste a clean example into the question. Read sscce.org. –  Xeo Mar 14 '12 at 6:44
    
Oh, and the answer to the question: You were most likely outsmarted by the compiler (note the missing construction copy inside g, this is what your example actually prints). With optimizations enabled, the compiler simply elides all those moves/copies. –  Xeo Mar 14 '12 at 6:54
    
@Xeo: Your example is missing a return in X f(). –  Mankarse Mar 14 '12 at 6:55
    
@Mankarse: Ehh.. yes, thanks. Not anymore, now. And the point still stands (this was just a "typo"). –  Xeo Mar 14 '12 at 6:57
3  
I can't see any code. Please post a complete question with any example code in the body of your question. –  Charles Bailey Mar 14 '12 at 7:02
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1 Answer 1

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo():
        Memory(nullptr)
    {
        cout<< this << "Foo Constructor"<<endl;
    }

    ~Foo()
    {
        cout<< this << "~Foo Destructor"<<endl;
        if(Memory != nullptr)
            delete []Memory;
    }

    Foo(Foo& rhs)
        :Memory(nullptr)
    {
        cout<<this << "Copy Constructor"<<endl;

        //allocate
        //this->Memory = new ....
        //copy 
        //memcpy(this->Memory, rhs.Memory...);
    }

    Foo& operator=(Foo& rhs)
    {
        cout<<"="<<endl;
    }
    void* Memory;

    Foo(int nBytes) { Memory = new char[nBytes]; }

    Foo(Foo&& rhs)
        {
        cout<<this << "Foo Move Constructor"<<endl;

                 Memory = rhs.Memory;


                 rhs.Memory = nullptr;
        }

};

Foo Get()
{
    Foo f;
    cout << &f << "f" <<endl;
    return f; 
}

void Set(Foo rhs)
{
    Foo obj(rhs);
    cout << &obj << "obj"<<endl;
}

int main()
{
    Set(Get());
    return 0;
}

output...

0x7fffe38fa0a0 Foo Constructor
0x7fffe38fa0a0 f
0x7fffe38fa070 Copy Constructor
0x7fffe38fa070 obj
0x7fffe38fa070 ~Foo Destructor
0x7fffe38fa0a0 ~Foo Destructor

Answer: Due to the Named Return Value Optimization the parameter rhs is constructed inplace as an alias of local variable f. (That is to say rhs and f are the same instance).

As rhs is an lvalue, the copy constructor is used to copy construct obj from rhs.

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