Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public static int getIntegerFromBitArray(BitArray bitArray)
{
  var result = new int[1];
  bitArray.CopyTo(result, 0);
  return result[0];
}

// Input  A) 01110
// Output A) 14
// Input  B) 0011
// Output B) 12 <=== ????? WHY!!! :)

Can some one please explain me why my second return value is 12 instead of 3?? Please ... Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Please show us how did you use this method, how was Input A & b built. –  gdoron Mar 14 '12 at 7:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Basically it's considering the bits in the opposite order to the way you were expecting - you haven't shown how you're mapping your input binary to a BitArray, but the result is treating it as 1100 rather than 0011.

The documentation isn't clear, admittedly, but it does work the way I'd expect it to: bitArray[0] represents the least significant value, just as it usually is when discussing binary (so bit 0 is 0/1, bit 1 is 0/2, bit 2 is 0/4, bit 3 is 0/8 etc). For example:

using System;
using System.Collections;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BitArray bits = new BitArray(8);
        bits[0] = false;
        bits[1] = true;

        int[] array = new int[1];
        bits.CopyTo(array, 0);
        Console.WriteLine(array[0]); // Prints 2
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The first input(01110) is symmetric, so he didn't not notice... +1 –  gdoron Mar 14 '12 at 7:40
    
The order actually makes perfect sense once you try to implement a function like CopyTo. –  Croo Mar 14 '12 at 7:47
    
Thank you a lot –  Grrbrr404 Mar 14 '12 at 7:50

You need rotate bit's to right direction to get right results. 1100 is 12

share|improve this answer
1  
No, rotation isn't what's required here - it's reflection. For example, if the OP's input were 1101, the result would be 11 (8 + 2 + 1), and you can't get that by rotating a bit pattern of 1101... –  Jon Skeet Mar 14 '12 at 7:43
    
Yes, you are right. I mean rotate by 180 ;). Reflection is most appropriate here. if 1101 rotate by 180 we get 1011. 11 ^10 = 1011 ^2 –  gabba Mar 14 '12 at 8:18
1  
It's not clear whether you're being flippant or not, but just in case you're not, "rotate by 180" would normally mean "rotate through 180 bits" - I would never use the term "rotate" for "reflect". –  Jon Skeet Mar 14 '12 at 8:33
    
Reflection is most appropriate here. –  gabba Mar 14 '12 at 19:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.