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How can i create a optional parameter in C# as we create in VB.Net

Public Sub Demo(ByVal a As Integer,Optional ByVal  b as integer=3)
End Sub

I want to declare this in C#

I am using VS2008

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Fox32, ShadowScripter, Jayendra, Thor Apr 26 '13 at 10:11

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2  
For that feature you need C#4 (VS 2010). –  Henk Holterman Mar 14 '12 at 9:01
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This will do the trick:

public void Demo(int a, int b = 3)
{
    //Do some stuff
}

Edit:

If you cannot use optional parameters and don't want to use nullable types, method overloading might do the work:

public void Demo(int a)
{
    Demo(a, 3);
}

public void Demo(int a, int b)
{
    //Do stuff
}
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Default parameter specifiers are not permitted : Error –  The Indian Programmmer Mar 14 '12 at 9:02
3  
Like @Henk Holterman said in his comment on your question. Optional parameters were introduced in Visual C# 2010. More info: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd264739.aspx –  Abbas Mar 14 '12 at 9:04
    
Check my updated answer. –  Abbas Mar 14 '12 at 9:09
    
I believe that VB generates overloads for optional parameters internally anyway - so crafting these by hand with C# would lead to the same result. –  Tom W Mar 14 '12 at 9:49
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public void foo(int a, int? b)
{
}

You can use function as:

foo(4,null)

And default parameter in c# this thread

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I dont want to use nullable –  The Indian Programmmer Mar 14 '12 at 9:05
    
Check my updated answer. –  Abbas Mar 14 '12 at 9:08
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