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I have this query that runs quite well but is getting very slow as the entries increase in the db. Can someone help to optimize it?

SELECT t1.* 
FROM tbl1 t1 
LEFT JOIN tbl2 t2 on t1.id = t2.tbl1_id AND t2.my_id ='5' 
WHERE t2.tbl1_id IS NULL AND
      t1.userid !='5' AND
      t1.base <= 95 AND
      t1.aloc > 0 AND
      t1.cred > 0 AND
      t1.pause < 1 AND
      t1.admin_se < 1
ORDER by t1.cred+0 DESC 
limit 20");

code to create table 1

CREATE TABLE tbl1 ( id int(30) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, msg tinytext COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci, userid varchar(30) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, _date varchar(30) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, base varchar(30) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, cred varchar(30) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, aloc varchar(30) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, _expire varchar(30) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, expire_date varchar(30) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, _count int(30) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', pause int(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', src_ varchar(10) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, original_url varchar(255) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, short_url varchar(255) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, short_url_code varchar(255) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, scheduler int(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', admin_se int(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', autoloadval varchar(10) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', lng int(30) NOT NULL DEFAULT '1', rinterval varchar(30) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL, rcat int(10) NOT NULL DEFAULT '5', PRIMARY KEY (id) ) ENGINE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=11151 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci

Code to create tbl2

CREATE TABLE tbl2 ( tbl2id int(30) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, my_id int(30) DEFAULT NULL, tbl1_msg_id int(30) DEFAULT NULL, _date varchar(30) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, _type varchar(5) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, fol varchar(100) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, pr_id int(30) DEFAULT NULL, msg_id varchar(255) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL, tracking_id varchar(255) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', val_optimizer int(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', PRIMARY KEY (tbl2id) ) ENGINE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=147014 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci

Kindly consider that I'm new to mysql. I don't understand most of the technical terms.

I just want to get this script to run fast. thanks

Why I did "order by t1.cred+0" I have values in the cred field from 0 to 9999. I want to list from the biggest but interestingly, 5 is listed before 10. don't know how to deal with it

share|improve this question
3  
As with any "help optimize mysql query", post the output of EXPLAIN before asking for help. –  N.B. Mar 14 '12 at 9:46
    
How slow is "very slow"? What performance do you require/expect? What indexes are set up on these two tables? –  Mark Bannister Mar 14 '12 at 9:49
1  
Like @N.B. said, post output of EXPLAIN <your query>. Also include output of SHOW CREATE TABLE t1 and SHOW CREATE tbl2. Why are there quotes around 5 ('5')? If this is integer data, don't quote it, you might make it impossible for MySQL to use an index on those columns (if it exists). Also, why do you order on t1.cred+0, instead of simply t1.cred ? this again may make it impossible for MySQL to use an index to support the order by operation. –  Roland Bouman Mar 14 '12 at 9:53

4 Answers 4

Have you added indexes to t1.id and t2.tbl1_id and t1.cred+0?

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rogchap, I sincerely don't understand that as I'm newbie. Kindly check the query to create both tables as I have added –  Enstine Muki Mar 14 '12 at 12:32
    
Adding indexes is the answer. Why ask a question if you don't want to know the answer?? –  reinierpost Mar 14 '12 at 14:08

Try to add some index on your keys. (t1.id and t2.tbl1_id) and on group by field aswell (t1.cred+0)

Using b-tree, for example, is a good idea.

Read something about indexes

share|improve this answer
    
Is an r-tree a good idea also? –  N.B. Mar 14 '12 at 9:46
    
@N.B. r-tree are used for create indexes for multidimensional spaces so I suppose that b-tree - in that case - are the best choice. But I have no such experience about r-tree for say that they can't be used here. –  DonCallisto Mar 14 '12 at 9:50
    
So how does one swap between different data structures? Your answer implies you can freely choose various data structures to hold indexes. –  N.B. Mar 14 '12 at 9:56
    
@N.B. My answer only say that b-tree(s) in that case is a good choice. Isn't it? –  DonCallisto Mar 14 '12 at 9:58
    
You can't choose what type of data structure MySQL will use when creating indexes with INDEX keyword. Suggesting that one should specifically use b-tree is not really much of an advice. You didn't mention what columns should be indexed or why. Throwing a statement such as "Using b-tree, for example, is a good idea" isn't really heplful, is it? Seeing we have b-tree or hash indexes (and hash ones in specific circumstances only) makes your answer not really useful. That was the point of my comment. –  N.B. Mar 14 '12 at 10:38

Might be useful if you show us your SQL code to create the table so that we can see what you have or haven't indexed.

The slowness is not going to be caused by your SQL (usually) but on how your index your table.

Jim

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I have uploaded the queries to create the two tables –  Enstine Muki Mar 14 '12 at 12:34

Try to rewrite it using exists:

SELECT * 
FROM tbl1 t1
WHERE t1.userid !='5'
  AND t1.base <= 95
  AND t1.aloc > 0 
  AND t1.cred > 0
  AND t1.pause < 1    
  AND t1.admin_se < 1
  and not exists (select null from tbl2 t2 where t1.id = t2.tbl1_id AND t2.my_id ='5')
ORDER by t1.cred+0 DESC limit 20;

And what is the purpose t1.cred+0? This will render index on t1.cred unusable.

EDIT: indexes speed up data retrieval. In this case you will need index by cred as this is order by/limit 20 column. Use your original query (as Mark Bannister commented, join mostly performs better than exists in MySql). But make sure you lose +0 part because sql engine will probably not be able to use index.

create index ix_tbl1_cred on tbl1(cred);

You will profit mostly by indexing equality columns, including join targets. Here is index on tbl2 column used to join tbl2 to tbl1. Now MySql will not have to read entire table2 for each row in table1 because it will check index for existance of t1.id in t2.tbl1_msg_id

create index ix_tbl2_tbl1_msg_id on tbl2(tbl1_msg_id);

This might be sufficient for this query. Other columns are not equality columns so index will have less impact. I should know your data to propose other indexes.

share|improve this answer
    
It should be a not exists, not an exists, and you need to remove the t2.tbl1_id IS NULL condition from the main WHERE clause. Also, left outer joins tend to be faster in MySQL than the equivalent exists/not exists clauses - this is the opposite of the behaviour found in many other databases (such as SQLServer). Still, it couldn't hurt to try it... –  Mark Bannister Mar 14 '12 at 9:54
    
I've just edited my response. Thanks for spotting the error and for info on MySql. –  Nikola Markovinović Mar 14 '12 at 9:59
    
You still have the t2.tbl1_id IS NULL condition in the main WHERE clause. –  Mark Bannister Mar 14 '12 at 10:03
    
Nikola Markovinović I have used your solution but it's still slow. I think I have issue with indexing. That's what I don't really understand in mysql. I'm still new to it. I have posted script to create both tables. Please check it and advice. –  Enstine Muki Mar 14 '12 at 12:31
    
I added indexes to tables as proposed by Nikola Markovinović above and the speed issue is resolved. I think that's the solution I needed. Thanks Nikola Markovinović and thanks to all that commented and responded. I'm grateful –  Enstine Muki Mar 14 '12 at 13:43

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