Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to generate a fixed length hash using the code below.

public int GetStableHash(string s)
        {
            string strKey = "myHashingKey";
            UnicodeEncoding UE = new UnicodeEncoding();
            byte[] key = UE.GetBytes(strKey);
            byte[] contentBuffer = UE.GetBytes(s);
            // Initialize the keyed hash object.
            HMACSHA256 myhmacsha256 = new HMACSHA256(key);
            byte[] hashValue = myhmacsha256.ComputeHash(contentBuffer);
            return BitConverter.ToInt32(hashValue,0);
        }

It gives me output like this.

-1635597425

I need a positive number fixed length (8 digits). Can someone plz tell me how to do that.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
unchecked
{
    int num = BitConverter.ToInt32(hashValue,0);

    if (num < 0)
    {
        num = -num;
    }

    num %= 100000000;
}

I'm using the unchecked because otherwise -int.MinValue would break (but note that normally programs are compiled with the unchecked "flag" "on")

The code means:

    unchecked

don't do overflow controls

    if (num < 0)
    {
        num = -num;
    }

make the number positive if negative

    num %= 100000000;

take the remainder (that has 0-8 digits)

much shorter:

return unchecked((int)((uint)BitConverter.ToInt32(hashValue,0) % 100000000));
share|improve this answer
    
This worked fine but I have a question. Is the output after remainder a valid hash? Like a hash is unique (I think) but the remainder of two 10 digit numbers can be the same. So again "will it be a valid hash"? Sorry if I'm confusing something. –  Mujtaba Hassan Mar 14 '12 at 10:36
    
@MujtabaHassan An hash isn't "unique". It's statistically difficult to reproduce (it has various properties that guarantee it). The full SHA1 hash is 160 bits long. The more bits you take away, the easier it's to find a second object with the same hash. –  xanatos Mar 14 '12 at 10:38

You're trying to get a 8-digit number from a hash function output which can have up to

lg(2^256) ~ 78

decimal digits.

You should either consider changing hash function or substitute up to 26 bits (2^26 = 67108864, 2^27 = 134217728 - 9 digits already) rounded down to 3 bytes (24 bits) from output and get Int32 from those 3 bytes.

public int GetStableHash(string s)
{
    ...
    byte[] hashValue = myhmacsha256.ComputeHash(contentBuffer);
    byte[] hashPart = new byte[3];
    hashValue.CopyTo(hashPart, 29); // 32-3
    return System.BitConverter.ToInt32(hashPart, 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
On this line "hashValue.CopyTo(hashPart, 230); // 256-26" I get following exception "Destination array was not long enough. Check destIndex and length, and the array's lower bounds.". hashValue has only 32 bytes so I changed it to start from 9 instead of 230 but exception still throwing. –  Mujtaba Hassan Mar 14 '12 at 10:24
    
Secondly do you think it would be a valid hash if we just ignore some bytes? I'm a little confused of this idea. –  Mujtaba Hassan Mar 14 '12 at 10:27
    
Aww, sorry. 26 bits => 3 bytes (24 bits, rounded down because 4 bytes-integer can easily have more that 8 digits). Corrected my answer and code. It would be a valid hash just that collision probability will be much higher. Anyway, you can't have anything significantly better if you have a limitation of 8 decimal digits. –  Sergey Kudriavtsev Mar 14 '12 at 10:30
    
I don't understand what is the problem :S still same exception. Even I tried with hashValue.CopyTo(hashPart, 30); and also with 31 :( Are you able run this code? –  Mujtaba Hassan Mar 14 '12 at 10:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.