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When trying to initialize static members with the Nifty Counter C++ Idiom I got some troubles with it. Can you explain how to correctly use the ideom in the following case?

The problem seems to be following: I have two static objects in different compilation units, where the one is using the static members of the other (CDataFile). Because the initialization order in this case is not defined – and in the production environment it was in the wrong order –, I tried to use the Nifty Counter idiom. But it seems, that now the static members of CDataFile are initialized twice (constructor called twice). First time, the constructor gets called in the CDataFileInitializer which is fine. After that the static members are used (mSome gets filled), but then the constructor of CSomeClass is called a second time and the content of mSome is cleared.

// datafile.h
class CDataFile
{
    friend class CDataFileInitializer;
protected:
    static CSomeClass mSome;
    // other code
};

static class CDataFileInitializer
{
public:
    CDataFileInitializer();
} dfinitializer;

// datafile.cpp
static int nifty_counter;
CSomeClass CDataFile::mSome; // second initialization comes from here?

CDataFileInitializer::CDataFileInitializer()
{
    if (!nifty_counter++)
    {
        printf("CDataFileInitializer Constructor\n");
        CDataFile::mSome= CSomeClass(); // first initialization
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
This is not nifty counter. This is undefined behaviour. – Mankarse Mar 14 '12 at 10:13
    
@Mankarse: Can you please explain why it is undefined? – Christian Ammer Mar 14 '12 at 10:14
    
The dynamic initialisation of CSomeClass CDataFile::mSome is indeterminately sequenced with respect to the dynamic initialisation of dfinitializer, so when operator= is called on CDataFile::mSome, it may not yet have been constructed. – Mankarse Mar 14 '12 at 10:22
    
@Mankarse If (and only if) CSomeClass has a non-trivial constructor. – James Kanze Mar 14 '12 at 10:33
    
@JamesKanze: True - but there wouldn't be much point to the nifty counter idiom if the class had a trivial constructor anyway. – Mankarse Mar 14 '12 at 10:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The line:

CSomeClass CDataFile::mSome;

defines a variable of type CSomeClass. The initialisation of this variable happens in two stages: First it is zero-initialised, this (approximately) means that the memory in which it resides is all set to 0. After that, dynamic-initialisation occurs. This causes its constructor to be run.

dfinitializer follows a similar "zero-initialise then dynamic initialise" pattern. In its dynamic initialisation step it calls operator= on CDataFile::mSome, in order to assign a new default constructed CSomeClass() to mSome.

This step is totally pointless, because the dynamic initialisations of mSome and of dfinitializer are indeterminately sequenced relative to each other. If dfinialiser gets initialised first, it will attempt to assign to an object which has not been created (and which will later be default-constructed), and if it gets initialised second it will reassign to an object which has already been created.

Instead of:

CSomeClass CDataFile::mSome;

you should create a region of storage in which the object can be constructed:

alignas(CSomeClass) unsigned char CDataFile::mSome[sizeof(CSomeClass)];

Then change CDataFileInitializer to:

CDataFileInitializer::CDataFileInitializer()
{
    if (!nifty_counter++)
    {
        printf("CDataFileInitializer Constructor\n");
        new (&CDataFile::mSome) CSomeClass();
    }
}

An alternative would be to use a function static variable:

CSomeClass& getMSome() {
    static CSomeClass mSome;
    return mSome;
}

This will lazily initialise mSome in a thread-safe manner.

share|improve this answer
    
That's the best solution, if your compiler has alignas or something similar (and if it doesn't do link time type checking on the types of variables, but I don't know of any compiler which does). – James Kanze Mar 14 '12 at 11:09
    
@JamesKanze: My answer didn't make it clear, but I was actually suggesting changing the type of mSome in datafile.h too (and then casting it whenever it is needed). I don't see how that would violate any type constraints. – Mankarse Mar 14 '12 at 11:14
    
If you're requiring a reinterpret_cast every time you use the object, clients aren't going to be very happy. Formally, defining the object with one type, and accessing it as another is undefined behavior. Practically, declaring it as a CSomeClass in the header, but as you've done in the source file, will work without problems. It's what I'd do (if I could be sure of having alignas). – James Kanze Mar 14 '12 at 11:27
    
@JamesKanze: The reinterpret_cast would of course be wrapped in a function. As for your other point, I will have to do some more reading to see how it could be addressed. – Mankarse Mar 14 '12 at 11:34
    
At which point, why not just use the singleton idiom, or a factory function? I wouldn't use the nifty pointer in new code. For that matter, I think that without the constraints of history, we'd have std::cout(), rather than just std::cout. Once you use the function, you don't need anything else; just define a static local data, and return a reference to it. – James Kanze Mar 14 '12 at 11:40

If you define an object at namespace scope, its constructor will be called by the start-up code at some point during initialization. If you want to use the nifty counter idiom, you need to somehow suppress this, or make it a no-op. You must also use placement new within the actual initializer. There are several ways to achieve this:

  • Most of the industrial strength implementations I've seen will either declare the object in assembler, or use a compiler extension to ensure that the constructor doesn't get called. This isn't very portable, but for things like iostream, which can't be implemented in pure C++ anyway, it's often acceptable. (This is, in fact, the only acceptable solution for the iostream objects, since they aren't allowed to be destructed.)

  • I've generally arranged to have a special no-op constructor, which does nothing. Formally, it isn't guaranteed to work, but in practice, it does. You then define the instance for which you use the nifty counter idiom to use this constructor.

  • Finally, if you control the class being constructed, and the only instances are controled by the nifty counter, if it can have a trivial constructor, you don't need to work about constructors, just initialize the various members in the initializer.

None of these are particularly nice solutions, and in new code, I'd use some variant of the singleton idiom.

share|improve this answer
    
In your second point your wrote that a special constructor which does nothing should be called in the nifty counter code-part, shouldn't it be vice versa: The default constructor should do nothing and the special constructor should initialize? In your third point: With the initializer you mean the initializer list or a initializing method Init()? But doesn't the problem remain, that the static object has not been created in the nifty counter code-part – or is it already zero initialized and the default constructor which is called later should do nothing (like your second point)? – Christian Ammer Mar 14 '12 at 12:35
    
@ChristianAmmer In the second point: it depends, but if the object is to be used elsewhere, you want the default constructor to behave normally. The no-op constructor is a special case, only for use in special situations, and for that reason, I prefer that it be marked; the definition of the object constructed by the nifty counter algorithm should be something like MyClass obj( noopConstructor ); so that the reader immediately sees that something special is going on. And in the third case: I was proposing not to have any non-trivial constructor. – James Kanze Mar 14 '12 at 14:03

yes an no: yes it is called twice and no is called on two different objects.

Let's say yo have

// A.cpp
#include "datafile.h"
...

and

// B.cpp
#include "datafile.h"
...

because of the #include A.cpp and B.cpp will both have a local and independent copy of dfinitializer.

datafile.cpp has in turn nifty_counter (you had better to define it with an initial 0 value... static int nifty_counter = 0;) and CDatafile::mSome (initialized at file level).

What CDataFileInitializer ctor does, is assign to the already initialized mSome the temporary CSomeClass() that is created and destroyed on the fly.

All that is -in fact- a wrong implementation doing the right thing, just because CDataFile is assignable.

If the problem is just initialize the static data member, all you have to do is ensure that something in the module containing the static member definition (note: definition, not declaration) is called by the others producing some side effect in the module (just to avoid to be optimized out)

so... let's try a better trick

//some.h
#ifndef SOME_H_INCLUDED
#define SOME_H_INCLUDED

#include<iostream>
class CSome
{
public:
    CSome() { std::cout << "CSome["<<this<<"] default created" << std::endl; }
    CSome(const CSome& s) { std::cout << "CSome["<<this<<"] created from ["<<&s<<"]" << std::endl; }
    CSome& operator=(const CSome& s) { std::cout << "CSome["<<this<<"] assigned from ["<<&s<<"]" << std::endl; return *this; }
    CSome(CSome&& s) { std::cout << "CSome["<<this<<"] created moving ["<<&s<<"]" << std::endl; }
    CSome& operator=(CSome&& s) { std::cout << "CSome["<<this<<"] assigned moving ["<<&s<<"]" << std::endl; return *this; }
    ~CSome() { std::cout << "CSome["<<this<<"] destroyed" << std::endl; }
};
#endif // SOME_H_INCLUDED




//datafile.h
#ifndef DATAFILE_H_INCLUDED
#define DATAFILE_H_INCLUDED

#include "some.h"
class CDataFile
{
public:
protected:
    static CSome mSome;
};

static class CDataFileInitializer
{
public:
    CDataFileInitializer();
    ~CDataFileInitializer();
} datafileinitializer;


#endif // DATAFILE_H_INCLUDED



//datafile.cpp
#include "datafile.h"
#include <iostream>
static int nifty_counter = 0; //the one and only

CSome CDataFile::mSome; //define and initialize

CDataFileInitializer::CDataFileInitializer()
{
    std::cout << "CDataFileInitializer["<<this<<"] creation"<< std::endl;
    if(!nifty_counter++)
    {
        std::cout << "CDataFileInitializer FIRST INITIALIZATION"<< std::endl;
    }
}

CDataFileInitializer::~CDataFileInitializer()
{
    std::cout << "CDataFileInitializer["<<this<<"] destruction"<< std::endl;
    if(!--nifty_counter)
    {
        std::cout << "CDataFileInitializer LAST DESTRUCTION"<< std::endl;
    }
}


//A.cpp
#include <iostream>
static class A
{
public:
    A() { std::cout << "initializing A.cpp" << std::endl; }
    ~A() { std::cout << "cleaning A.cpp" << std::endl; }
} a;
#include "datafile.h"
// other a.cpp code ...

void call_a() { std::cout << "do something in a.ccp" << std::endl; }


//B.cpp
#include <iostream>
static class B
{
public:
    B() { std::cout << "initializing B.cpp" << std::endl; }
    ~B() { std::cout << "cleaning B.cpp" << std::endl; }
} b;
#include "datafile.h"
// other b.cpp code ...

void call_b() { std::cout << "do something in b.ccp" << std::endl; }


//main.cpp
#include <iostream>

void call_a();
void call_b();

int main()
{
    std::cout << "main" << std::endl;
    call_a();
    call_b();
    std::cout << "main return" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

will give the following output:

CDataFileInitializer[0x406035] creation
CDataFileInitializer FIRST INITIALIZATION
CSome[0x40602c] default created
initializing A.cpp
CDataFileInitializer[0x406029] creation
initializing B.cpp
CDataFileInitializer[0x406025] creation
main
do something in a.ccp
do something in b.ccp
main return
CDataFileInitializer[0x406025] destruction
cleaning B.cpp
CDataFileInitializer[0x406029] destruction
cleaning A.cpp
CSome[0x40602c] destroyed
CDataFileInitializer[0x406035] destruction
CDataFileInitializer LAST DESTRUCTION

Of courses, addresses will change depending on your machine and run.

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