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I doing another question from the Eular problems page. The sum of the primes below 10 is 2 + 3 + 5 + 7 = 17. Find the sum of all the primes below two million.

I've managed to write the code below but i think somewhere along the line (namely when we get to big prime numbers) the code loses accuracy. The answer should be 142913828922 but i get 1179908154.

I dont know why im not getting the answer because the code below works for under 10.

Any help would be great. the reason im doing these problems is to get better at C.

code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>

/* Initialise */
void CalcNumber(unsigned long number);
int isPrime(unsigned long number);

/* Functions*/

void CalcNumber(unsigned long number)
{
    unsigned long i = 1;
    unsigned long prime = 0;

    while(i != number)
    {
        i++;
        if(isPrime(i))
        {
            printf("prime: %lu\n", i);
            prime += i;
        }
    }

    printf("The sum of primes under %lu: %lu\n",number, prime);
    printf("count: %d\n", i);

}

int isPrime(unsigned long number)
{
      int i, nb, count, test,limit;
      test = count = 0;
      nb = number;
      limit = sqrt(nb) + 1;

      if(nb == 2)
      {
          return 1;
      }

      if (nb % 2 == 0)
              test = 1;
      else{
          for (i = 3 ; i < limit && ! test; i+=2, count++)
            if (nb % i == 0)
              test = 1;
      }
      if (!test)
              return 1;
      else
              return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    unsigned long number;

    printf("Enter a number: \n");
    scanf("%ul", &number );
    CalcNumber(number);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this question
2  
What is the size of unsigned long on your computer? If you want it to work, the answer should be 64. –  mouviciel Mar 14 '12 at 10:20
2  
@spartan2417 How much long is your long? :-) And I'm not kidding. Under Windows it's still 32 bits, so not long enough. –  xanatos Mar 14 '12 at 10:21
1  
Have a try on unsigned long long int then ;) –  Jonas Wielicki Mar 14 '12 at 10:22
1  
Yes, and if unsigned long long won't work, try uint64_t or unsigned __int64 (depending on your compiler). –  Mr Lister Mar 14 '12 at 10:25
2  
@Constantinius: I disagree about codereview; their FAQ includes the line, To the best of your knowledge, does the code work? –  sarnold Mar 14 '12 at 10:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Considering the length of the number you should use a data type long at least 64 bits. The newer C99 standard includes the long long (and unsigned long long) datatype that is at least 64 bits. If you need to printf them you have to use "%lld" and "%llu".

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void CalcNumber(unsigned long number)
{
    unsigned long i = 1;
    unsigned long prime = 0;

    while(i != number)
    {
        i++;
        if(isPrime(i))
        {
            printf("prime: %lu\n", i);
            prime += i;
        }
    }

Note that you're checking roughly twice as many numbers as you need to. The only even prime number is 2, so there's no point checking anything other than odd numbers greater than or equal to 3 -- and add in 1+2 "by hand". You might as well use i += 2; here.

Your isPrime() method will re-calculate a lot of information. What PE is really getting at is using the Sieve of Eratosthenes to build a table of prime numbers and then sum the primes from that.

But if you'd really like to continue along with your current isPrime() method, I'd like to give a very strong hint that you drop the test variable completely and return from the method immediately when you know a number isn't prime. It will lead to code that is easier to read and easier to debug.

Consider writing some test cases that test isPrime() specifically. Check the Usual Suspects: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 15, 16, 17, etc.

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+1 for code refactoring - thanks! –  SD1990 Mar 14 '12 at 10:31

Your variable storing the sum of the prime number is unsigned long and the unsigned long range is from 0 to 4294967295. It can't hold 142913828922 number. 142913828922 mod (4294967295 + 1) = 1179908154

Change you data type

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