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I am reading a file using perl script. This file consists of strings with different characters and I am supposed to identify strings containing the character 'X'. I want to know how should I (1) print this string (containing 'X') and also (2) write this string to another file (3) count the number of 'X' characters in the whole file. The script below prints the whole file again. Any suggestions?

#!/use/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

open (FILE, "/home/user/Desktop/infile.phy") || die "cant open file\n";
my @body = <FILE>;
close (FILE);
my $count= 0;
my $string = '';
foreach $_(@body){
	if ($_ =~ m/[X]/){
		print "$_";
		$count++;
		print $count;
	}
	else {
		print ;
	}
}
exit;
share|improve this question
1  
Is this homework? –  Sinan Ünür Jun 9 '09 at 13:21
1  
I was thinking the same thing, but it could just as easily be a sample problem from a introductory text. –  inkedmn Jun 9 '09 at 13:27
1  
At some point, you need to open your 'another file' and ensure that you write to it. Also, try to avoid using that form of 'open'; use a form that returns the file handle for use with a regular $variable: open($fh, "filename"); or one of the variants. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 9 '09 at 13:35
1  
For the purposes of this exercise, there is no obvious reason to slurp the whole file into an array. It would be more sensible to read each line in the loop: while ($line = <$fh>) { ...check line and print... } –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 9 '09 at 13:36
    
@Sinur No this is not homework. I am new to perl and this is a small part of the big problem I am coding for. Thanks for the reply! –  shubster Jun 9 '09 at 14:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since this is code review, let's go one by one:

#!/use/bin/perl

That shebang line is most likely a typo. It should probably be

#!/usr/bin/perl

or whatever which perl returns on your system.

use strict;
use warnings;

Good.

open (FILE, "/home/user/Desktop/infile.phy") || die "cant open file\n";

No need for package global filehandles when you can use lexical filehandles. The 3-argument form of open is preferable these days. Also, the error message should indicate the file which you could not open:

my $filename = '/home/user/Desktop/infile.phy';
open my $input, '<', $filename
    or die "Cannot open '$filename' for reading: $!";

my @body = <FILE>;

You are slurping the file into an array. That is completely unnecessary in this case.

my $count  = 0;
my $string = '';

Declare and initialize (if necessary) any variables in the smallest possible scope.

my $count;

The variable $string is not used anywhere else in your code.

foreach $_(@body){

This is silly. for uses $_ if no loop variable is specified. It is easier to keep things straight if you instead specify a lexical loop variable.

for my $line ( @body ) {

However, I do not think you should slurp the file.

        if ($_ =~ m/[X]/){

That results in a successful match if the line contains an X. So, it is equivalent to /X/. However, that will not tell you the word that contained the 'X'. For that, you need to decide what a word is and do your matching at the word level.

With all that in mind, consider the following script. I have made a simplifying assumption regarding what I consider to be a word. You should be able to build on this to satisfy all the requirements:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $filename = "$ENV{TEMP}/test.txt";
open my $input, '<', $filename
    or die "Cannot open '$filename' for reading: $!";

my $count;

while ( my $line = <$input> ) {
    my @words = grep { /X/ } split /\b/, $line;
    $count += @words;
    print join(', ', @words), "\n";
}

print "$count\n";

__END__

UPDATE: If you do not care about finding the words within each line that have one or more X characters, the while loop would be simplified:

while ( <$input> ) { 
    $count += (my @matches = /(X)/g );
    print if @matches;
}

by using $_. That, however, is probably inefficient (given that we are saving each matched X character). In this case, tr works best:

my ($count, $n);
$n = tr/X// and $count += $n and print while <$input>;
share|improve this answer
    
I agree with all your review remarks. However, point 3 in the question asks "count the number of 'X' characters in the whole file". Your solution, instead, counts the number of words (strings? that depends on the definition of "strings") that contain an 'X' char. –  user55400 Jun 9 '09 at 13:58
    
@blixtor: Thank you for catching that. Of course, each word could contain multiple X characters. In fact, I now realize the OP did not care about splitting the lines into words etc. –  Sinan Ünür Jun 9 '09 at 14:13
    
The 3-arg form of open is sometimes useful and sometimes not. It is easy to always use 2-arg open safely, and sometimes you want its ability to take default IO layers from the open pragma or -C switch. If you are going to criticize 2-arg opens, at least say "because you may unsafely use a variable filename someday", not just "it's the new way to do it". –  ysth Jun 9 '09 at 16:16
    
Try your simplified while loop version on a file with no X and see why $count should be initialized to 0 :) –  ysth Jun 9 '09 at 16:20
    
@ysth Arrrrrrgh! It is just proof that the if statement is completely unnecessary. –  Sinan Ünür Jun 9 '09 at 16:33

Assuming "string" in your question equals "line":

use strict;
use warnings;

@ARGV=qw(/home/user/Desktop/infile.phy);

my $count = 0;
open my $outfile, '>', 'outfile' or die $!;
while (<>) {
  my $cnt = tr/X/X/;
  if ($cnt) {
    print;
    print $outfile $_;
  }
  $count += $cnt;
}

close $outfile or die $!;

print $count;
share|improve this answer

You are printing $_ in both branches of your if-clause. Get rid of the else branch.

share|improve this answer
    
It might not be obvious to a newcomer that 'print ;' prints '$_', but that is what happens. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 9 '09 at 13:31
    
exactly. I could have been a bit more verbose. sorry. –  innaM Jun 9 '09 at 13:33

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