Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

in an interface, I store constants in this way (I'd like to know what you think of this practice). This is just a dummy example.

interface HttpConstants {
    /** 2XX: generally "OK" */
    public static final int HTTP_OK = 200;
    public static final int HTTP_CREATED = 201;
    public static final int HTTP_ACCEPTED = 202;
    public static final int HTTP_NOT_AUTHORITATIVE = 203;
    public static final int HTTP_NO_CONTENT = 204;
    public static final int HTTP_RESET = 205;
    public static final int HTTP_PARTIAL = 206;

        ...
}

Is there a way I can iterate over all constants declared in this interface ?

share|improve this question
    
Opinion: enums do provide a lot of benefits in modern code, highly recommended. BUT not in all cases. Strings are used a lot analogue to "identifier" (e.g. attribute names, properties keys, JSF view IDs, JPA named query names and query placeholders, security roles, ...). Problem: string literals are very easy to mistype, and have no compile time checking. I prefer to declare all such strings as constants, usually in an enum. HOWEVER, when using them as annotation parameters, enums aren't allowed and one still has to fall back on public static final Strings similar to your code. – fr13d Jun 25 '14 at 15:32
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Using reflection:

Field[] interfaceFields=HttpConstants.class.getFields();
for(Field f:interfaceFields) {
   //do something
}

But anyway, if you can redesign your class, I would recomend you to handle a static enum constants construction. So, suposing your class will contain always an int value for every constant:

enum HttpConstants {

    HTTP_OK(200), HTTP_CREATED(201), HTTP_ACCEPTED(202),
    HTTP_NOT_AUTHORITATIVE(203),HTTP_NO_CONTENT(204), 
    HTTP_RESET(205), HTTP_PARTIAL(206) /* ... */;

    private int value;

    HttpConstants(int aValue) {
        value=aValue;
    }

    public int getValue() {
        return value;
    }
}

Then, to loop on it:

    for(HttpConstants val: HttpConstants.values()) {
        int value=val.getValue();
            //...
    }

Thus, avoiding the access to the reflection API.

share|improve this answer
for(Field f : HttpConstants.class.getFields()){
       int constant = f.getInt(null);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
btw those constants are defined in java.net.HttpURLConnection – Esben Skov Pedersen Mar 14 '12 at 10:48

I would create these constants as an enumeration. Enums in Java can have their own fields and methods, which very convenient for your case. So I would do this the following way:

enum HttpConstant {
    HTTP_OK(200),
    HTTP_CREATED(201),
    HTTP_ACCEPTED(202),
    HTTP_NOT_AUTHORITATIVE(203),
    HTTP_NO_CONTENT(204),
    HTTP_RESET(205),
    HTTP_PARTIAL(206);

    private final int id;

    HttpConstant(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    int getId() {
        return id;
    }
}

Now the iteration is easy:

for (HttpConstant constant : HttpConstant.values()) {
    //Do something with the constant
}

This way it is also easy to add associate some new values with the constants, you just have to add new fields.

Right now you may use reflection:

Field[] interfaceFields = HttpConstants.class.getFields();
for (Field field : interfaceFields) {
    int constant = field.getInt(null);
    //Do something with the field
}

However, it is better to use the approach with enums because with reflection coding errors result in runtime exceptions instead of compile-time errors.

share|improve this answer
public enum HttpConstant {
    /** 2XX: generally "OK" */
    HTTP_OK(200).
    HTTP_CREATED(201),
    HTTP_ACCEPTED(202),
    HTTP_NOT_AUTHORITATIVE(203),
    HTTP_NO_CONTENT(204),
    HTTP_RESET(205),
    HTTP_PARTIAL(206);

    private int code;
    private HttpConstant(int code) {
        this.code = code;
    }

    public int getCode() {
        return code;
    }
}

with HttpConstant.values().

share|improve this answer

Well usually when i have something like that i make a Map in the interface that has the keys - constant names with values constant - values.

And that's how i can iterate over them.

share|improve this answer

If you want to use reflection, you can use the Class.getDeclaredFields() method. See here for an example: http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/ALT/Reflection/

Scroll down to "Finding Out About Class Fields" for some example code.

share|improve this answer

I'd like to know what you think of this practice

Consider using an enum instead of an interface with constants.

enum HttpResultCode {
    HTTP_OK(200),
    HTTP_CREATED(201),
    HTTP_ACCEPTED(202),
    HTTP_NOT_AUTHORITATIVE(203),
    HTTP_NO_CONTENT(204),
    HTTP_RESET(205),
    HTTP_PARTIAL(206);

    private final int code;

    private HttpResultCode(int code) {
        this.code = code;
    }

    public int getCode(int code) {
        return code;
    }

    public static HttpResultCode forCode(int code) {
        for (HttpResultCode e : HttpResultCode.values()) {
            if (e.code == code) {
                return e;
            }
        }

        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid code: " + code);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.