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I have g:select that is filed with some model. This is it:

<g:select style="width: 200px" name="selectEmployee" from="${employees}" noSelection="['null':'-Choose one-']" value="${realname}" />

Can I set up g:select to default value of my bean property if not null and if null to -Choose one- ?

Let's say I'm using this on form for editing Task instance. And in Task domain class I have field employee so when I'm creating new Task instance I want to add charged employee name among other data. So, in combobox that is populated with Employee domain class instances I would like by default to have a value of employee property of that Task instance in it's not null and if null some text like noSelection="['null':'-Choose one-']"

The idea is that I can changed person in charge of the task I'm editing using that g:select.

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1 Answer 1

Sure!

The g:select typically works from a domain class and a list of domain classes and you would set the value to something like this....

<g:select name="employee.id" from="${employees}" noSelection="['null':'-Choose one-']" optionKey="id" value="${employee?.id}" />

Setting the optionKey works in conjunction with the value to set the selected item. If the value is null then the noSelection is used. If the value is not null then the selected employee will be chosen.

Also, its important to understand how grails binds parameters through the names of the HTML elements. If your not sure how this works i would strongly suggest doing some tutorials.

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Thanks for a quick reply. I'm not sure we understood each other :) So I've updated my question. –  johndoe Mar 15 '12 at 11:19
    
Updated my answer. If your still unsure I would recommend looking at a grails tutorials. –  Michael J. Lee Mar 15 '12 at 15:13

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