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I wanted to know whether I can run my website locally without hosting it on the web server/IIS?

I mean I have created a website in VS 2010 which runs when I click on run button in vs. I have hosted the application on the localhost.

But if I try to run the application by going to the application folder and click on the very first html/homescreen, will it respond the way it does when I click on the run in vs2010.

I want to run my app locally without the IIS OR ANY webserver, so that I can give a demo like a prototype on a machine that does not contain IIS.

What if my app contains some ajax calls?Can it run without hosting on the web server?

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3  
How would you propose to host a site without hosting it? Your only real option of not using IIS in this scenario is to install Visual Studio and use the inbuilt web server (cassini/iis express) but that goes against your wishes... Baffling question. – Justin Wignall Mar 14 '12 at 11:07
    
What's the problem with having IIS on the demo machine? I often demo things which are connecting through our internal network to my dev machine's IIS. When you visit an ASP.NET page, something has to do something with that ASP code to render the html, you need something to host the .NET framework to serve the request. – Paulie Waulie Mar 14 '12 at 11:10
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The short answer is no. IIS is available on most flavours of windows and is quick and easy to both setup and remove. No reason not to do it compared to any possible alternative.

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of course there is, run it via node. – MSSucks Mar 30 '14 at 5:23

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