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                var names = new[] { 
                            new { Name = "John", Age = 44 },
                            new { Name = "Diana", Age = 45 },
                            new { Name = "James", Age = 17 },
                            new { Name = "Francesca", Age = 15} 
                            };

            for (int i = 0; i < names.Length; i++)
            {
                names[i].Age = 23; //-------->Error
                names[i] = new { Name = "XYX", Age = 26 }; //----->Works fine
            }

            foreach(var name in names)
            {
                name.Age = 1;  //-------->Error
                name = new { Name = "ABC", Age = 25 };  //-------->Error
            }

I have two questions here. 1. Why I was not able to change the any attribute of an iteration variable.
2. I was only able to assign a new object to the iteration variable in for loop. Not in foreach loop. Why?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Question 1: Why I was not able to change the any attribute of an iteration variable?

From the documentation on Anonymous Types:

Anonymous types provide a convenient way to encapsulate a set of read-only properties

You cannot change the values of the properties in your anonymous type, so

name.Age = 1;
// and
names[i].Age = 1; 

are equally invalid.


Question 2. I was only able to assign a new object to the iteration variable in for loop. Not in foreach loop. Why?

From the documentation on IEnumerable:

An enumerator remains valid as long as the collection remains unchanged.

You would invalidate the iterator if you change the backing list in any way. Consider what would happen if the iterator returned the items in a specific order based on the Age field, for example.

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Note: This is an answer to question 1. –  Matthias Mar 14 '12 at 11:17

Why I was not able to change the any attribute of an iteration variable.

You're using anonymous types, which always have read-only properties in C#. (In VB they're read/write by default but can be made read-only with the Key modifier.)

From the C# 4 spec, section 7.6.10.6:

An anonymous object initializer declares an anonymous type and returns an instance of that type. An anonymous type is a nameless class type that inherits directly from object. The members of an anonymous type are a sequence of read-only properties infverred from the anonymous object initializer used to create an instance of the type.

For your second question...

I was only able to assign a new object to the iteration variable in for loop. Not in foreach loop. Why?

The language specification defines it that way. In particular, even if you could change the variable, that wouldn't change the array, unless the language specification made it work just for arrays. In general, foreach uses IEnumerable/IEnumerator (or members looking like that) which only provides a "reading" view of the sequence.

From section 8.8.4 of the C# 4 spec:

The iteration variable corresponds to a read-only local variable with a scope that extends over the embedded statement.

(Importantly, although it's a single read-only variable, its value changes between iterations. In C# 5 this will be changed so that it's effectively a "new" variable on each iteration. The difference is only important when the variable is captured by something like a lambda expression.)

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Thanks, In particular, even if you could change the variable, that wouldn't be able to change the array. Is this variable holds a copy of the original object. –  Vaibhav Jain Mar 14 '12 at 11:19
1  
@vaibhav: No, it holds a copy of the reference to the original object. The array only holds references too. If you want to change the value in the array, you need to change the array contents. Just changing a variable whose value is a copy of the reference in the array won't do anything. –  Jon Skeet Mar 14 '12 at 11:20
    
names[i] = new object, In this statement , I am changing the original object, not the copy of it. –  Vaibhav Jain Mar 14 '12 at 11:25
    
@vaibhav: No, you're changing the contents of the array. The array element now refers to a different object. You're not making any change to the object which the array element previously referred to. –  Jon Skeet Mar 14 '12 at 11:27

As for question 2): In the "works fine" case you are not changing the iteration variable. In that case, the iteration variable is i. What you do is replace one element of an array with a new element. This always works.

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Because foreach uses an enumerator, and enumerators can't change the underlying collection, but can, however, change any objects referenced by an object in the collection. This is where Value and Reference-type semantics come into play.

On a reference type, that is, a class, all the collection is storing is a reference to an object. As such, it never actually touches any of the object's members, and couldn't care less about them. A change to the object won't touch the collection.

On the other hand, value types store their entire structure in the collection. You can't touch its members without changing the collection and invalidating the enumerator.

Moreover, the enumerator returns a copy of the value in the collection. In a ref-type, this means nothing. A copy of a reference will be the same reference, and you can change the referenced object in any way you want with the changes spreading out of scope. On a value-type, on the other hand, means all you get is a copy of the object, and thus any changes on said copy will never propagate.

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