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As currently executing thread while it encounters the call [sleep][1](); then thread moves immediately into sleeping state where as for [yield][2](); thread moves into runnable state/ready state

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What does their javadoc say? –  JB Nizet Mar 14 '12 at 11:23
    
Rule of thumb: 1) never use yield(); 2) use sleep() only when the program is explicitly required to wait for the specified amount of time (if you only need to "wait a little bit", most chances are that you are doing it wrong and you need to implement a proper waiting/signaling mechanism). –  Ilia K. Mar 14 '12 at 13:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 21 down vote accepted

sleep() causes the thread to definitely stop executing for a given amount of time; if no other thread or process needs to be run, the CPU will be idle (and probably enter a power saving mode).

yield() basically means that the thread is not doing anything particularly important and if any other threads or processes need to be run, they should. Otherwise, the current thread will continue to run.

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Yield : will make thread to wait for the currently executing thread and the thread which has called yield() will attaches itself at the end of the thread execution. The thread which call yield() will be in Blocked state till its turn.

Sleep : will cause the thread to sleep in sleep mode for span of time mentioned in arguments.

Join : t1 and t2 are two threads , t2.join() is called then t1 enters into wait state until t2 completes execution. Then t1 will into runnable state then our specialist JVM thread scheduler will pick t1 based on criteria's.

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sleep()causes the thread to definitely stop executing for a given amount of time; if no other thread or process needs to be run, the CPU will be idle (and probably enter a power saving mode). yield()basically means that the thread is not doing anything particularly important and if any other threads or processes need to be run, they should. Otherwise, the current thread will continue to run.

Refer http://preciselyconcise.com/java/concurrency/b_sleep.php

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Sleep() causes the currently executing thread to sleep (temporarily cease execution).

Yield() causes the currently executing thread object to temporarily pause and allow other threads to execute.

enter image description here

Read this for a good explanation of the topic.

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There are mistake in this flow: from Sleeping state to Ready-to-run we use interrupt() rather than notify() and notifyAll() –  NguyenDat May 19 '12 at 7:05
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nice chart on thread flow. –  Mdhar9e Jul 25 '12 at 6:25
    
nice chart,it helps me to understand the life cycle of thread more deep and clear. –  Amit Oct 18 '14 at 2:24

We can prevent a thread from execution by using any of the 3 methods of Thread class:

  1. yield()
  2. join()
  3. sleep()
  1. yield() method pauses the currently executing thread temporarily for giving a chance to the remaining waiting threads of the same priority to execute. If there is no waiting thread or all the waiting threads have a lower priority then the same thread will continue its execution. The yielded thread when it will get the chance for execution is decided by the thread scheduler whose behavior is vendor dependent.

  2. join() If any executing thread t1 calls join() on t2 i.e; t2.join() immediately t1 will enter into waiting state until t2 completes its execution.

  3. sleep() Based on our requirement we can make a thread to be in sleeping state for a specified period of time (hope not much explanation required for our favorite method).

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Also waiting on some synchronisation object such as a mutex. –  Nick Mar 14 '12 at 11:25
    
nice explanation,thanks Anantha. –  Amit Oct 18 '14 at 2:19

Sleep causes thread to suspend itself for x milliseconds while yield suspends the thread and immediately moves it to the ready queue (the queue which the CPU uses to run threads).

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