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When I call a local method from my class as shown in the example below, do I have to put $this-> before it?

Example:

class test{
    public function hello(){
        $this->testing(); // This is what I am using
        testing(); // Does this work?
    }
    private function testing(){
        echo 'hello';
    }
}

The reason why I ask is because I am using the array_map function with a predefined PHP function in it and I am now going to use a function defined by me. This is what I mean:

class test{
    public function hello(){
        array_map('nl2br',$array); // Using predefined PHP function
        array_map('mynl2br',$array); // My custom function defined within this class
    }
    private function mynl2br(){
        echo 'hello';
    }
}
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9  
Why don't you just test if it works? –  Another Code Mar 14 '12 at 11:59
    
Just wondering: Why didn't you just try if it works? As far as I know, i won't work. You will have to supply array_map(array($this, 'mynl2br'), $array);. See the php manual for more information. –  x3ro Mar 14 '12 at 12:01
1  
I didnt test it because I actually wanted a technical explanation of whether or not it would work in order to allow myself and other to understand it better –  Ben Carey Mar 14 '12 at 12:09
1  
Don't know why people voted down as this is an important question! –  pät Mar 14 '12 at 12:17
1  
@BenCarey That's completely right, and in no way I meant to say that you shouldn't have asked or that it was unacceptable to ask without testing it first; just explaining why it was downvoted and giving some hints for future questions. This site is meant for learning :) –  Another Code Mar 14 '12 at 12:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, it is required. testing() refers to the global function by that name, and will cause an error if the function doesn't exist.

You can, however, make a "callback" with the $this variable. As you can see from the PHP manual, you need to make an array where the first element is the object and the second element is the method name. So here you could do this:

array_map(array($this, 'mynl2br'), $array);
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I had no idea you could pass a callback as an array!! This is exactly the answer I was looking for! Thank you –  Ben Carey Mar 14 '12 at 12:11

Test it yourself :P

The result is that the testing(); doesn't get triggered but $this->testing(); does. testing(); only refers to functions outside of a class.

<?php
class test{
    public function hello(){
        $this->testing(); // This is what I am using
        testing(); // Does this work?
    }
    private function testing(){
        echo 'hello';
    }
}

function testing() {
    echo 'hi';
}

$test = new test();
$test->hello(); // Output: hellohi
?>

See @lonesomeday's answer for a possible solution to your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Not convinced polluting the global namespace is a good idea here... –  lonesomeday Mar 14 '12 at 12:04
    
@lonesomeday Me neither but that's all I knew. Your answer is obviously the better choice. –  Rick Kuipers Mar 14 '12 at 12:06

In order to use a class’ method as a callback, you need to pass an array containing the object instance and the method name instead of just the method name:

array_map(array($this, 'mynl2br'), $array);

Instead of

array_map('nl2br', $array);
share|improve this answer

Alternatively you can use Closures:

array_map(function($el) { ...; return $result; }, $array); 
share|improve this answer
    
Again, I wasnt aware you could use these sorts of callbacks in PHP. I had only ever used it in javascript! Thanks for the info –  Ben Carey Mar 14 '12 at 12:14
    
Closures are php => 5.3.0 –  Joeri Feb 19 at 11:56

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