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I want to create a shortcut with Powershell for this executable:

C:\Program Files (x86)\ColorPix\ColorPix.exe

How can this be done?

share|improve this question
    
Begining PowerShell 5.0 New-Item, Remove-Item, and Get-ChildItem have been enhanced to support creating and managing symbolic links see this answer – JPBlanc Mar 12 '15 at 6:12
    
If you want to run a Shortcut As Administrator you can use this answer. – JPBlanc Mar 12 '15 at 7:30
up vote 59 down vote accepted

I don't know any native cmdlet in powershell but you can use com object instead:

$WshShell = New-Object -comObject WScript.Shell
$Shortcut = $WshShell.CreateShortcut("$Home\Desktop\ColorPix.lnk")
$Shortcut.TargetPath = "C:\Program Files (x86)\ColorPix\ColorPix.exe"
$Shortcut.Save()

you can create a powershell script save as set-shortcut.ps1 in your $pwd

param ( [string]$SourceExe, [string]$DestinationPath )

$WshShell = New-Object -comObject WScript.Shell
$Shortcut = $WshShell.CreateShortcut($DestinationPath)
$Shortcut.TargetPath = $SourceExe
$Shortcut.Save()

and call it like this

Set-ShortCut "C:\Program Files (x86)\ColorPix\ColorPix.exe" "$Home\Desktop\ColorPix.lnk"

If you want to pass arguments to the target exe, it can be done by:

'Set the additional parameters for the shortcut  
$Shortcut.Arguments = "/argument=value"  

before $Shortcut.Save().

For convenience, here is a modified version of set-shortcut.ps1. It accepts arguments as its second parameter.

param ( [string]$SourceExe, [string]$ArgumentsToSourceExe, [string]$DestinationPath )
$WshShell = New-Object -comObject WScript.Shell
$Shortcut = $WshShell.CreateShortcut($DestinationPath)
$Shortcut.TargetPath = $SourceExe
$Shortcut.Arguments = $ArgumentsToSourceExe
$Shortcut.Save()
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it works :) – cethint Mar 14 '12 at 12:27
1  
Happy to help, accept this as the answer! Thanks1 – CB. Mar 14 '12 at 12:34
1  
Very minor, but just for the sake of consistency I would have the syntax of Set-ShortCut cmdlet to be more like MKLINK, or Set-Alias where the alias or link comes as first argument and then the target. param ( [string]$LinkPath, [string]$TargetPath ) – orad Jan 28 '14 at 18:51
    
Begining PowerShell 5.0 New-Item, Remove-Item, and Get-ChildItem have been enhanced to support creating and managing symbolic links see this answer – JPBlanc Mar 12 '15 at 6:13
    
One limitation of either the WshShell COM component or cmd /c mklink workarounds is a very limited character set for naming the .lnk file. A name containing a → will fail, for example. One way around this, if you need better character support, is to [Web.HttpUtility]::UrlEncode() (after Add-Type -AN System.Web) the filename while creating the .lnk file, then renaming it to the UrlDecoded name using Rename-Item. – brianary Nov 17 '15 at 7:06

Beginning PowerShell 5.0 New-Item, Remove-Item, and Get-ChildItem have been enhanced to support creating and managing symbolic links. The ItemType parameter for New-Item accepts a new value, SymbolicLink. Now you can create symbolic links in a single line by running the New-Item cmdlet.

New-Item -ItemType SymbolicLink -Path "C:\temp" -Name "calc.lnk" -Value "c:\windows\system32\calc.exe"

Be Carefull a SymbolicLink is different from a Shortcut, shortcuts are just a file. They have a size (A small one, that just references where they point) and they require an application to support that filetype in order to be used. A symbolic link is filesystem level, and everything sees it as the original file. An application needs no special support to use a symbolic link.

Anyway if you want to create a Run As Administrator shortcut using Powershell you can use

$file="c:\temp\calc.lnk"
$bytes = [System.IO.File]::ReadAllBytes($file)
$bytes[0x15] = $bytes[0x15] -bor 0x20 #set byte 21 (0x15) bit 6 (0x20) ON (Use –bor to set RunAsAdministrator option and –bxor to unset)
[System.IO.File]::WriteAllBytes($file, $bytes)

If anybody want to change something else in a .LNK file you can refer to official Microsoft documentation.

share|improve this answer
1  
Is it possible to also set the icon for the shortcut? – orad Aug 10 '15 at 3:59
1  
A symlink is very different from a shortcut, though. A symlink created using New-Item in "${env:AppData}\Microsoft\Windows\SendTo" won't show in the Explorer Send To menu, e.g., and doesn't allow customizing Shortcut properties like icon or working directory. – brianary Nov 16 '15 at 22:46
    
@brianary is completly right, I made a confusion here ! I edit my answer so that anybody can downvote. – JPBlanc Nov 17 '15 at 6:36

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