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We normally use abstract function/Interfaces in our projects. Why it is really needed? Why can't we just go for Business logic Layer, Data Access Layer and Presentation Layer only

Function in Presentation Layer:

abc();

Function in Business Logic Layer:

 public void abc()
    {
      //Preparing the list
    }

Function in Data Access Layer:

public abstract void abc();

Function in Data Access SQLServer Layer:

 public override void abc()
    {
       //Connection with database
    }

Question is: Why is the Data Access Layer required ?

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Mar 21 '12 at 12:06

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8 Answers 8

The easiest way to understand this, imo, is an abstraction over DataLayer.

You have set a functions to retrieve a data from xml file. But one day your product scales out and xml is not enough like a data storage. So you pass to some embeded database: sqlite. But one day you need to reuse your library in some enterprise context. So now you need to develop access to sqlserver, oracle, webservice.... In all these changes you will need to change not only the code that actually access the data, but the code that actually consumes it too. And what about the code that already use for years your first xml data access on client and happy with it? How about backcompatibility?

Having the abstraction if not direcly solves most of this problems, but definitely makes scallable your application and more resistant to changes, that, in our world, happen sometimes too frequently.

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My question is improved.Right? Need votes to reopen it.... –  abcdefghi Mar 14 '12 at 13:13
    
I didn't vote for closing it before. –  Tigran Mar 14 '12 at 13:21
    
Could not understand it when you said "How about backcompatibility?" Can you make it more precise please ? –  abcdefghi Mar 14 '12 at 13:28
    
or can you come up with some example ? –  abcdefghi Mar 14 '12 at 13:31
    
If your application along all that architectual mutations would have a single absraction layer to acess a data, for the client that used local xml file wouldn't change too much after update to a latest version of your application which uses Azure. You have one single abstraction that uses the same set a function: before for acessing xml and after acessing cloud. If in your program there are codes written by third party developers 5 years ago, that code have not to be touched and continue to work perfectly, without any particilar knowledge about real source if the data. –  Tigran Mar 14 '12 at 13:36

Generally, if you use interfaces in your code, then you will gain code manuverability in the form of Dependency Injection.

This will help you replace parts of your implementation in certain situations for example providing Mock objects during Unit Testing.

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you can also join chat here chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/8875/… –  abcdefghi Mar 14 '12 at 15:55

I think you are talking about Facade layer.

It is an optional layer which will simplify the functions of Business Layer. Let's imagine, you have a ProductManager and CategoryManager and you want to do a particular action which involves using both (for example, get me top 5 products in all categories) then you could use a facade layer that uses ProductManager and CategoryManager.

It is inspired by Facade Pattern.

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The abstraction helps create functionality, be it through a base class, an interface, or composition which, when used properly, does wonders for maintenance, readability, and reusability of code.

In regards to the code posted in the question, the code marked "Data Access Layer" acts as a common abstraction for the business layer to use. By doing so, the specific implementations of the the DAL (such as what's under "Data Access SQLServer Layer" in the sample) are decoupled from the business layer. Now you can make implementations of the DAL that access different databases, or perhaps automatically feed data for testing, etc.

The repository pattern is a fantastic example of this at work in a DAL (example is simplified):

public interface IProductRepository
{
    Product Get(int id);
    ...
}

public class SqlProductRepository : IProductRepository
{

    public Product Get(int id) { ... }
    ...
}

public class MockProductRepository : IProductRepository
{
    private IDictionary<int, Product> _products = new Dictionary<int, Product>()
    {
        { 1, new Product() { Name = "MyItem" } }
    };

    public Product Get(int id) { return _products[id]; }
    ...
}

public class AwesomeBusinessLogic
{
    private IProductRepository _repository;

    public AwesomeBusinessLogic(IProductRepository repository)
    {
        _repository = repository;
    }

    public Product GetOneProduct()
    {
        return _repository.GetProduct(1);
    }
}

Even though this example uses interfaces, the same applies to the use of base classes. The beauty is that now I can feed either SqlProductRepository or MockProductRepository into AwesomeBusinessLogic and not have to change anything about AwesomeBusinessLogic. If another case comes along, all that's needed is a new implementation of IProductRepository and AwesomeBusinessLogic will still handle it without change because it only accesses the repository through the interface.

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**Now you can make implementations of the DAL that access different databases**Microsoft Enterprise library do this job for me in DAL layer. –  abcdefghi Mar 19 '12 at 5:01
    
Yes, MS Enterprise library will help you achieve that, but what if a decision is made that your repository will now be exposed as a Web Service like WCF data services (aka ado.net data services)??? If you have created your Repository as an interface then it is easy to replace it -- that's all the story... hope it is clear for you now. –  CSharpenter Mar 20 '12 at 12:44
    
Did not get you.. honestly. What to do with including WCF in your architecture? Ok, Why can't WCF interact directly with DataBase layer? Every layer is a seperate project. –  abcdefghi Mar 21 '12 at 9:01

All of the previous answers may explain the needs of abstract layers, but I still want to add some of my thoughts.

Let's say that in our project we just have one implementation of a service in each layer. For instance, I have a contact DAL and a contact BLL service , and we could do something like this

namespace Stackoverflow
{
    public class ContactDbService
    {
        public Contact GetContactByID(Guid contactID)
        {
            //Fetch a contact from DB
        }
    }
}

Contact BLL service:

namespace Stackoverflow
{
    public class ContactBLLService
    {
        private ContactDbService _dbService;
        public ContactBLLService()
        {
            _dbService = new ContactDbService();
        }

        public bool CheckValidContact(Guid contactID)
        {
            var contact = _dbService.GetContactByID(contactID);

            return contact.Age > 50;

        }
    }
}

without defining interfaces/ abstract classes.

If we do like that, there would be some obvious drawbacks.

  1. Code communication: Imagine that if your project involves, your services may have many different methods, how could a maintainer (apart from you) know what your services do? Will he have to read your entire service in order to fix a small bug like InvalidCastOperation? By looking at the interface, people will have the immediate knowledge of the capabilities of the service(at least).
  2. Unit testing

    You could test your logic using a fake/mock service to detect bugs in advance as well as prevent regression bugs from happening later.

  3. Easier to change:

    By referencing only by interfaces/ abstract classes in other classes, you could easily replace those interface implementations later without too many efforts of work.

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By referencing only by interfaces/ abstract classes in other classes, you could easily replace those interface implementations later without too many efforts of work. This can be done by doing directly in DAL layer. Why interfaces? By looking at the interface, people will have the immediate knowledge of the capabilities of the service(at least). We normally create the function names as per the modules and as per the specific need. Why interfaces ? –  abcdefghi Mar 19 '12 at 4:53
    
We normally create the function names as per the modules and as per the specific need. Why interfaces ? How do I know what your class can do if I don't have any descriptions of your functions? Will I have to search and read all functions of your class in order to know what I should call from BLL? –  Toan Nguyen Mar 19 '12 at 5:37
    
Are you trying to say comments in header section of a function? –  abcdefghi Mar 19 '12 at 5:58
    
No I mean that, let's say you develop services and later on I will pick up your work and continue with that. How could I know about the details of your services? –  Toan Nguyen Mar 19 '12 at 7:18
    
There are basically two ways. 1. Press Ctl + M + o This will shos you the function names only and function definition hidden in the DAL layer. 2. Instantiate the class and type object. this will show you the complete list of functions with function comments summary as defined by you. Why Interfaces then ? –  abcdefghi Mar 19 '12 at 8:11

The abstract class or interface is not really a separate layer - it should be part of your business logic layer and it defines the interface that the actual data access layer (SQL data repository, for example) needs to implement to provide the data access service to your business layer.

Without this interface your business layer would be directly dependent on the SQL layer, while the interface removes this dependency: You put the abstract class or the interface into the business logic layer. Then the SQL layer (a separate assembly, for example) implements the abstract class/interface. This way the SQL layer is dependent on the business layer, not the other way around.

The result is a flexible app with an independent business layer that can work with multiple data repositories - all it needs is a layer that implements the interface the business layer defines. And it is not really only about data repositories - your business layer shouldn't be dependent on the context (asp.net vs. console app vs. service etc.), it shouldn't be dependent on the user interface classes, modules interfacing with your business app, etc.

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Why did you create the dependency for Interface/Abstract class. What's the basic need? Any security? –  abcdefghi Mar 20 '12 at 6:45

Why interfaces : Have you ever used using in c# : using (Form f = new Form()) { }

Here you will see that you can use only those classes inside using which implements IDisposable interface .

Two things which does not know each other can interact with each other using Interfaces only. Interface gurantees that "some" functionality has surely been implemented by this type.

Why layers :

So that you can have separate dlls which will let you to reuse in different application.

Basically all is for code reuse and Performance gain.

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Interface gurantees that "some" functionality has surely been implemented by this type. So I need to track down all implementation of interface in complete project !!! –  abcdefghi Mar 21 '12 at 8:13
    
Not this way. We dont write interfaces for our selfs. Code/class that implements interface tells others that "hey, look" , "I am of this type, you can use me". e.g. your PC USB socket. Imagine that you start a billion $ company which provides USBs - superfast, cheap etc.. but only thing is that the area of USB from which you connect to PC is lets' say Hexagonal. Also you created your own Computers which has hexagonal port for this USB. Now tell me that can your USB is used by entire world? offcourse not !! The INTERFACE provided by your USB is not matching with other PCs. –  Dhananjay Mar 21 '12 at 9:00
    
But well that USB can be used by your computer as it has hexagn socket. Just think of USB=Data access layer and your Computer as UI layer. If you never want your data access layer to be used by some other projects then well "you dont need any INTERFACE". This example represents small part of why you need interfaces , there is more to it... Google them and you will find many more. Your USB will be with you only , however fast and cheap it is , it's of no use to others and only you can use it. –  Dhananjay Mar 21 '12 at 9:00
    
My every project is a separate project. Loosely coupled. –  abcdefghi Mar 21 '12 at 9:07
    
if you are willing to share your layers to outside world then you probably need to have interfaces. Abstarct class serves different purpose (some times use of implementation of interface can be equivalent to abstract class but mind you .... they are different things. e.g. 1 / 1 and 1 * 1 both equals 1 which does not mean that division and multiplication are same. –  Dhananjay Mar 21 '12 at 11:51

Abstraction enables you to do refactoring quickly. Think of instead of using SQL server, you decide to use some other provider; if you do not have a data access layer, then you to do a huge refactor because you are calling data access methods directly. But if you have a data access layer, you only write a new data access layer, inheriting from your abstract data access layer and you do not change anything in the business layer.

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