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I'm novice at cpp (using gcc on codeblocks), and I'd like to write a function that uses an array of records. However I keep getting the mentioned error when I call 'hanyadikceg' and I don't know with which variable it has a problem.

Thanks for the help!

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

struct rendeles {
    string nev;
int mennyiseg;
};

struct teaceg {
string nev;
int mennyiseg;
};

int szam; 
struct rendeles rendelt [100];      
struct teaceg cegek [100];          
int h;

int hanyadikceg (string cegnev)
{                            
    for (int i=0;i<szam;i++)
    {
        if (cegek[i].nev==cegnev)
            {
                return i;
            }
    }
    return -1;
}

int main()
{
    cout << "Hány db rendelés lesz összesen?";
    cin >> szam;
    if (szam > 100)
    {
        cout << "Hiba: túl nagy a rendelések száma! (100 a maximum)";
        return -1;
    }

    for (int i=0;i<szam;i++)        
    {
        cout << "A(z) " << i+1 <<". cég neve:";
        cin >> rendelt[i].nev;                                 
        cout << "A(z) " << i+1 <<". rendelés mennyisége:";
        cin >> rendelt[i].mennyiseg;                           
    }
    cout << endl;

    h = hanyadikceg('Lipton');              //the problem is in this line
    cout << "Hanyadik cég a xyz:" << h;

    for (int i=0;i<szam;i++)          
    {
        cout << "A(z) " << i+1 << ". rendelés: " << rendelt[i].nev << " " <<     rendelt[i].mennyiseg << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
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1  
is it 'Lipton' or "Lipton"? –  UmNyobe Mar 14 '12 at 13:05
1  
btw: having function and variable names in the lingua franca of programming makes it far easier to get help, since far more people are able to understand the code. –  PlasmaHH Mar 14 '12 at 13:05
    
Just curious, what language is that (I can't tell)? –  Jesse Good Mar 14 '12 at 13:09
    
Looks like Turkish. –  George Skoptsov Mar 14 '12 at 13:10
1  
@Jesse, I believe it is Hungarian. –  Moo-Juice Mar 14 '12 at 13:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You need to use double-quotes (") for string literals, not single-quotes (').

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You are using single quotes ('Lipton'). Single quotes are for char-literals.

Use "Lipton", for a const char* literal.

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h = hanyadikceg('Lipton');

should be

h = hanyadikceg("Lipton");
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Change 'Lipton' to "Lipton" in the problem line and the compilation error will go away.

In C/C++, double-quoted expressions are strings (or, technically, string literals) and resolve to char * or const char * type, while single-quoted expressions are characters (or character literals) and resolve to char type (which can be implicitly casted to int). That explains your error: the compiler cannot convert the char integer type to the const char * that the function signature requires.

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Just a note. String literals are always resolved to const. –  Moo-Juice Mar 14 '12 at 13:58
1  
String literals in C++ have type const char[N], where N is the length of the string including nul terminator. There's an implicit conversion to const char*, and in C++03 there's a deprecated conversion to char* for compatibility with C. IIRC, the deprecated conversion is removed in C++11. The function hanyadikceg calls for a std::string, and there's another implicit conversion from const char* to std::string. –  Steve Jessop Mar 14 '12 at 14:05

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